Critical Writing

Course descriptions

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CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 301
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Hipolit
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
KELLY WRITERS HOUSE 203
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 302
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Sadashige
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
VAN PELT LIBRARY 124
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 303
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Howard
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
KELLY WRITERS HOUSE 202
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 304
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Byala
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2C2
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 305
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Hipolit
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
KELLY WRITERS HOUSE 203
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 306
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Brown
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
BENNETT HALL 24
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 307
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Howard
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 315
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 308
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Walker
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
VAN PELT LIBRARY 124
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 309
TR 5:00pm-6:30pm
Kwok
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 220
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 310
MW 11:00am-12:30pm
Browning
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
KELLY WRITERS HOUSE 202
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 311
MW 11:00am-12:30pm
Wehner
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
KELLY WRITERS HOUSE 203
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 312
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Argaman
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
LEIDY LAB 109
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 313
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
Vellani
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 1
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 314
MW 5:00pm-6:30pm
Argaman
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
PSYCHOLOGY LAB C41
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 315
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Gay
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
KELLY WRITERS HOUSE 202
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

GLOBAL ENGLISH
WRIT 011 302
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Vellani
Global Cities
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 1
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY
This writing seminar examines the role of the city in the twenty-first century. In an increasingly urbanized world, the city has been portrayed as both a scourge and a panacea for humans. This writing seminar examines the phenomenon of the Global City with particular attention to why more and more cities wish to be defined as Global. What does 'Global' mean, and how is this designation measured and assigned? Readings in the seminar address a wide range of issues including architecture and design, spatial inequality, urban renewal, gentrification, and the economic and environmental challenges faced by metropolitan cities.

GLOBAL ENGLISH
WRIT 011 304
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
Mohr
Global Health
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 215
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY
In most of the world, multiple therapeutic traditions co-exist, sometimes symbiotically and at others competitively. Many societies have radically different ideas and practices concerning health, the body and disease than in the US. And these ideas and practices are contested both within these societies and between different societies in an emerging global world. In this writing seminar, we will examine several contested topics within the field of medical anthropology in Haiti, Ghana, Eastern Europe, Japan, India, Southern Africa and the US: holistic versus ontological approaches towards disease, the politics of suffering, religious healing and contestation, the meaning(s) of organ donation, biomedicine under conditions of poverty, female circumcision, the ethics of clinical trials in the developing world, and finally, HIV/AIDS. This course is designed to improve students’ writing skills via peer review, multiple drafts and revisions of essays, and midterm and final portfolios.

GLOBAL ENGLISH
WRIT 011 305
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Vellani
Global Cities
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
STITELER HALL B30
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY
This writing seminar examines the role of the city in the twenty-first century. In an increasingly urbanized world, the city has been portrayed as both a scourge and a panacea for humans. This writing seminar examines the phenomenon of the Global City with particular attention to why more and more cities wish to be defined as Global. What does 'Global' mean, and how is this designation measured and assigned? Readings in the seminar address a wide range of issues including architecture and design, spatial inequality, urban renewal, gentrification, and the economic and environmental challenges faced by metropolitan cities.

ANTHROPOLOGY
WRIT 013 301
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Brown
The Business of Doing Good
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In recent years, public institutions and community organizations have come to rely less on the State for support, and more on the philanthropic donations of corporations and wealthy individuals. Schools, nonprofits and aid organizations, thus, are often beholden to the vision and mission of their funders. This course will focus on the contradictions between intentions and outcomes in corporate and individual charitable giving. Through readings in anthropology, political science and business, we will explore the ways in which philanthropy might serve to maintain class, race and gender inequality and inhibit democracy. In reading, writing and class discussions, we will ask: Does the marketing of people’s need to funders depend on narratives that perpetuate poverty, inequality and hardship? Are powerful corporations and individuals capable of being socially responsible? This course will improve students’ skills in research, critical reasoning and academic writing.

ANTHROPOLOGY
WRIT 013 302
MW 11:00am-12:30pm
Mohr
Global Health
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In most of the world, multiple therapeutic traditions co-exist, sometimes symbiotically and at others competitively. Many societies have radically different ideas and practices concerning health, the body and disease than in the US. And these ideas and practices are contested both within these societies and between different societies in an emerging global world. In this writing seminar, we will examine several contested topics within the field of medical anthropology in Haiti, Ghana, Eastern Europe, Japan, India, Southern Africa and the US: holistic versus ontological approaches towards disease, the politics of suffering, religious healing and contestation, the meaning(s) of organ donation, biomedicine under conditions of poverty, female circumcision, the ethics of clinical trials in the developing world, and finally, HIV/AIDS. This course is designed to improve students’ writing skills via peer review, multiple drafts and revisions of essays, and midterm and final portfolios.

ART HISTORY
WRIT 015 301
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Kramer
Visual Communication
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In this seminar we will investigate the power of visual images and designs that circulate around the globe. Everything from on-line and text-based typefaces and colors to symbols and information graphics are socially and culturally bound, representing different meanings to different cultures. The research extends to the power and the responsibility visual communications specialists and designers wield in creating and disseminating visual design. Guided by Ruben Pater’s _The Politics of Design: A (Not So) Global Manual for Visual Communication_, the seminar will draw upon anthropology, communication science, cultural studies, design, psychology, and visual culture. We will focus on Pater’s work as a starting point for our own research and writing.

ART HISTORY
WRIT 015 302
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Kramer
Visual Communication
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In this seminar we will investigate the power of visual images and designs that circulate around the globe. Everything from on-line and text-based typefaces and colors to symbols and information graphics are socially and culturally bound, representing different meanings to different cultures. The research extends to the power and the responsibility visual communications specialists and designers wield in creating and disseminating visual design. Guided by Ruben Pater’s _The Politics of Design: A (Not So) Global Manual for Visual Communication_, the seminar will draw upon anthropology, communication science, cultural studies, design, psychology, and visual culture. We will focus on Pater’s work as a starting point for our own research and writing.

AMERICAN STUDIES
WRIT 017 301
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Manning
Urban Photography
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Since the decline of manufacturing in the Great Lakes region, amateur and professional photographers have used shuttered factories and rusted urban landscapes as the subjects of their art. Scholars and critics have referred to this phenomenon alternatively as “ruin photography,” “ruin porn,” and the “zombie aesthetic.” In this course, we will study a number of photography collections that span geography and style, including collections published by noted publishing houses to collections posted on online photo-sharing sites. As we become more critical viewers of ruin photography, we will consider the ethics of such representations. Our own writing practice will help us better understand what such photographic representations communicate about the people and locales they depict.

BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF BEHAVIOR
WRIT 021 301
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Hipolit
The Neuroscience of Free Will
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
For centuries, scientists and philosophers have grappled with the desire to understand the basis of our human behaviors. Are we biological machines, whose “brains made us do it”? Or do we have full choice over our actions? Recent findings from the field of neuroscience have provided important insights on this dilemma. Through this course we will examine the relationship between the mind and the brain, keeping in mind its relevance to individual responsibility. We will investigate the underlying “hardwiring” of the human brain that leads to inherent reflexes as well as shared perceptions and actions. Conversely, we will also see how our human behaviors do not happen in an isolated vacuum, and our interactions with other people, the environment, and our own personal sense of responsibility play a crucial role in our actions. These findings have important implications in the examination of legal responsibility as well as in our ability to understand our own behavior. Throughout this course, we will advance our understanding of the biological basis of free will through reading, researching, and writing about the topic.

BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF BEHAVIOR
WRIT 021 302
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Choi
Your Brain on Meditation
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Facebook posts, messenger notifications, Twitter feeds, not to mention emails, texts, and good ol' fashioned voicemails. We live in a digital age of distractions with so many tasks competing for our attention that all we're left with is depression, anxiety, and the eerie feeling that we've lost control of our own minds. But what if the solution to our modern illness was found by a man over two thousand years ago who decided to sit under a tree? In this seminar, we will uncover just what this man discovered and what science has to say about it. By blending ancient philosophy with cutting-edge neuroscience research, we will explore meditation in its many forms. Whether you think meditation is a clinically-tested exercise to reduce stress and increase mental health, or a powerful tool for spiritual liberation, in this course, you'll get the chance to study (and experience first-hand) your brain on meditation.

BIOLOGY
WRIT 022 301
MWF 11:00am-12:00pm
Manning
Animal Emotions
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
When our cat purrs in our lap, we might say, “He is content.” When our dog barks when we pet a friend’s dog, we might say, “She is jealous.” Is this mere anthropomorphizing—attributing human characteristics to non-human animals—or are the emotional lives of animals really as complex as humans? This course considers this question, and in doing so, we will broaden our scope to think about how the “animal question” has influenced contemporary critical and cultural theory. If the experiences of animals are as complex as human experience, how does that change our understanding of the human? Of the environment? In posing these questions, we will explore emerging lines of inquiry in the humanities like post-humanism, ecocriticism, and intersectionality. And we might even watch a cat video or two!

BIOLOGY
WRIT 022 302
MWF 12:00pm-1:00pm
Manning
Animal Emotions
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
When our cat purrs in our lap, we might say, “He is content.” When our dog barks when we pet a friend’s dog, we might say, “She is jealous.” Is this mere anthropomorphizing—attributing human characteristics to non-human animals—or are the emotional lives of animals really as complex as humans? This course considers this question, and in doing so, we will broaden our scope to think about how the “animal question” has influenced contemporary critical and cultural theory. If the experiences of animals are as complex as human experience, how does that change our understanding of the human? Of the environment? In posing these questions, we will explore emerging lines of inquiry in the humanities like post-humanism, ecocriticism, and intersectionality. And we might even watch a cat video or two!

BIOLOGY
WRIT 022 303
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
MacRae-Crerar
Microbes/Mental Health
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Mutation is the ultimate source of diversity. One random nucleotide change, hidden in DNA, can result in a whole new lineage of life. Invisible to the naked eye, 3.8 billon years of mutation have made microbes the most diverse organisms on the planet. These unseen unicellular creatures are the foundation of life as we know it. Vital insights into all other organisms on Earth—including ourselves—are provided by explorations of their vast morphologies, functionalities, and survival strategies. Microbes are proof of the power of hidden diversity; they are what we are all made of, which makes us all similar, yet different, from each other. But how is diversity defined and what role does it play in different communities and cultures? Together, we will examine the more visible aspects of diversity, such as ethnicity, and then go further to explore the less visible forms, such as the wide range of thought processes illustrated by those with various mental health outlooks. In this period of globalization, the way in which people respond to, and modify their understanding of, differences is at the forefront of discussion. Using Ed Yong’s book, I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes within Us and a Grander View of Life, this course will enable students to participate and lead these vital discussions on diversity from multiple perspectives. Writing assignments will focus on articulating the implications of unseen diversity, drawing parallels between unicellular life and to multi-level societal mores among humans.

BIOLOGY
WRIT 022 304
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
MacRae-Crerar
Microbes/Mental Health
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Mutation is the ultimate source of diversity. One random nucleotide change, hidden in DNA, can result in a whole new lineage of life. Invisible to the naked eye, 3.8 billon years of mutation have made microbes the most diverse organisms on the planet. These unseen unicellular creatures are the foundation of life as we know it. Vital insights into all other organisms on Earth—including ourselves—are provided by explorations of their vast morphologies, functionalities, and survival strategies. Microbes are proof of the power of hidden diversity; they are what we are all made of, which makes us all similar, yet different, from each other. But how is diversity defined and what role does it play in different communities and cultures? Together, we will examine the more visible aspects of diversity, such as ethnicity, and then go further to explore the less visible forms, such as the wide range of thought processes illustrated by those with various mental health outlooks. In this period of globalization, the way in which people respond to, and modify their understanding of, differences is at the forefront of discussion. Using Ed Yong’s book, I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes within Us and a Grander View of Life, this course will enable students to participate and lead these vital discussions on diversity from multiple perspectives. Writing assignments will focus on articulating the implications of unseen diversity, drawing parallels between unicellular life and to multi-level societal mores among humans.

BIOLOGY
WRIT 022 305
TR 9:00am-10:30am
MacRae-Crerar
Happiness Hypothesis
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
This seminar will focus on the ever-elusive concept of happiness and explore what it means and whether there is a biological component to it. Will happiness make us more productive and less anxious in an uncertain world? Does it come from within or is it created by external circumstances (e.g., “If I had more money, if I were thinner, I would be happy.”)? We will explore these questions as well as investigating scientific approaches to happiness and the techniques we can use to achieve it, using The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom by Jonathan Haidt, Professor of Ethical Leadership at the NYU-Stern School of Business. Haidt began his career studying negative moral emotions, such as disgust, shame, and vengeance, but then moved on to the understudied positive moral emotions, such as admiration, awe, and moral elevation. This work got him involved with the field of positive psychology, which was founded here at the University of Pennsylvania.

CINEMA STUDIES
WRIT 025 301
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Sadashige
Our Animals, Our Selves
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
We have all heard that elephants never forget. But how many of us know that they also weep? Or that captive orcas can learn to "speak dolphin?" Scholars from areas as diverse as philosophy, biology, social justice, and the arts are currently formulating a new field: animal studies. These scholars are exploring how animals think, what they feel, and in some cases working with animal rights activists to question our laws and personal behaviors in light of these discoveries. In this course we will add to the conversation by looking at how popular culture - especially films like Blackfish and the Cove - reflect and shape our understanding of non-human animals.

CINEMA STUDIES
WRIT 025 302
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Nelson
The Vampire Film
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
The vampire has been a staple of horror films since the early days of cinema. Vampires, who prey on the living by literally sucking the life out of them, represent some of our deepest fears. Yet since the earliest vampire film, the vampire has also been a sexual threat and speaks to our subconscious fears and desires. Grotesque, hideous, and terrifying, the vampire is nonetheless a figure of our never-ending fascination. Why is the vampire such a lasting and enduring figure? In this course, we will trace a history of the vampire film by looking at the earliest surviving example of the genre, F. W. Murnau’s Nosferatu. We will examine the film, its background, and how contemporary audiences reacted to it. We will also consider how Nosferatu influenced later vampire films, and why it continues to haunt audiences today.

CINEMA STUDIES
WRIT 025 303
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Paeth
Pixar and Masculinity
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
With films such as Toy Story, Finding Nemo, and WALL-E, Pixar Animation Studios has gained remarkable critical and commercial success. Although many would claim that their movies contain a positive message, a disproportionate number of these films feature male protagonists and tend to promote outdated notions of masculinity. How do these works reflect and reinforce dominant ideas about manhood? What might these films tell us about gender, conformity, and social hierarchy? How do these films present a particular vision of what it means to “be a man”? In order to answer these and other questions, we will identify, analyze, and interrogate representations of men and boys in Pixar films by viewing them through a variety of critical lenses. Through guided writings and class discussions, we will seek to understand the ways in which films by Pixar define masculinity, and how they can offer powerful insights into contemporary culture and society.

CINEMA STUDIES
WRIT 025 304
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Paeth
Pixar and Masculinity
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
With films such as Toy Story, Finding Nemo, and WALL-E, Pixar Animation Studios has gained remarkable critical and commercial success. Although many would claim that their movies contain a positive message, a disproportionate number of these films feature male protagonists and tend to promote outdated notions of masculinity. How do these works reflect and reinforce dominant ideas about manhood? What might these films tell us about gender, conformity, and social hierarchy? How do these films present a particular vision of what it means to “be a man”? In order to answer these and other questions, we will identify, analyze, and interrogate representations of men and boys in Pixar films by viewing them through a variety of critical lenses. Through guided writings and class discussions, we will seek to understand the ways in which films by Pixar define masculinity, and how they can offer powerful insights into contemporary culture and society.

CINEMA STUDIES
WRIT 025 305
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Whitbeck
Quentin Tarantino
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
The films of Quentin Tarantino are as brash and idiosyncratic as their protagonists: at once violent and farcical, crass and soulful, colloquial and philosophical. As a writer and director, Tarantino’s manifold references famously range from esoteric film history to cross-cultural fast food. This course considers Tarantino’s oeuvre to date—from Reservoir Dogs to Pulp Fiction and Inglorious Basterds—in terms of the various theoretical concerns and critical responses it raises. Is Tarantino’s work properly “postmodern”? Is it kitsch? How does genre work in his films? What purpose does his (often signature, always explicit) violence serve? We will use Tarantino’s own particular rhetoric to whet our own critical reading, writing, and viewing skills, culminating in a final research project.

CINEMA STUDIES
WRIT 025 306
TR 4:30pm-6:00pm
Whitbeck
Quentin Tarantino
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
The films of Quentin Tarantino are as brash and idiosyncratic as their protagonists: at once violent and farcical, crass and soulful, colloquial and philosophical. As a writer and director, Tarantino’s manifold references famously range from esoteric film history to cross-cultural fast food. This course considers Tarantino’s oeuvre to date—from Reservoir Dogs to Pulp Fiction and Inglorious Basterds—in terms of the various theoretical concerns and critical responses it raises. Is Tarantino’s work properly “postmodern”? Is it kitsch? How does genre work in his films? What purpose does his (often signature, always explicit) violence serve? We will use Tarantino’s own particular rhetoric to whet our own critical reading, writing, and viewing skills, culminating in a final research project.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
WRIT 027 301
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Howard
Costumes & Identity
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
From Superman’s iconic red “S” to Batman’s form-fitting leather suit, superheroes are defined by their attire. Equal parts gaudy, theatrical, and athletic, costumes are pivotal to the superhero’s widespread appeal, dividing the larger-than-life character from his civilian alter ego. However, this phenomenon is not limited to comics. Historically, costumes represented an inversion of one’s nature—an opportunity to escape the dreariness of everyday life and become someone new. This seminar will explore the consequences of using costumes to alter one’s identity, drawing on examples from both fiction and reality. Though superhero costumes will be the primary focus, we will ultimately move beyond caped crusaders to interrogate how even the most familiar costumes, from Halloween masks to the straw hats of Penn’s Hey Day, allow us to inhabit diverse identities. In addition, case studies involving “real-life” masked vigilantes, like Pussy Riot, will reveal the fluid interplay between popular culture and contemporary politics.

COMMUNICATIONS
WRIT 028 301
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
Wehner
Marketing Likes
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Everywhere you look online, from YouTube to Yelp, rating systems and “Like” buttons abound. We live in a world where expressing preferences has never been so easy, or more public. And while we may believe that our tastes and opinions are our own, efforts to influence our likes have intensified in a networked society where these rating systems have economic consequences. Researchers in marketing, psychology, new media, and sociology have tried to explain the dynamics of our preferences, and in some cases, suggest how they might be shaped. In this course, we will explore what research indicates about how our likes are formed, change, and become part of a sharing economy. Along the way, we will look at everything from the food or music we favor, to how we express those likes and loathings online. We will consider both individual tastes and societal trends, from the neuroscience of why you like coffee to whether having wide-ranging tastes has become the new marker of social class.

COMMUNICATIONS
WRIT 028 302
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Osborn
Big Data Revolution
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
The terms "big data" and "analytics" abound in contemporary discourse, but few nonspecialists understand their purposes or promises beyond monetization of our clicks, content preferences, and geolocations. Alongside their overt commercial ends, analytics may also provide "insights" about who we are, what makes us tick, and how we might live productive, healthier, and even more fulfilling lives. This section will examine the rewards—and costs—of scaled data and their social utility with reference to MIT data scientist Alex Pentland's notion of "social physics," quantified expressions of how we interact, produce, consume, and relate with information from cat videos to stock tips. Equal parts technology, information studies, and social science, this section may also be of interest to anyone with a Facebook account or mobile device.

COMMUNICATIONS
WRIT 028 303
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Wehner
Marketing Likes
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Everywhere you look online, from YouTube to Yelp, rating systems and “Like” buttons abound. We live in a world where expressing preferences has never been so easy, or more public. And while we may believe that our tastes and opinions are our own, efforts to influence our likes have intensified in a networked society where these rating systems have economic consequences. Researchers in marketing, psychology, new media, and sociology have tried to explain the dynamics of our preferences, and in some cases, suggest how they might be shaped. In this course, we will explore what research indicates about how our likes are formed, change, and become part of a sharing economy. Along the way, we will look at everything from the food or music we favor, to how we express those likes and loathings online. We will consider both individual tastes and societal trends, from the neuroscience of why you like coffee to whether having wide-ranging tastes has become the new marker of social class.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 301
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Caplin
Einstein and Picasso
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Fulfills the Writing Requirement The late 1800s-early 1900s was a rich period of time both in science and the arts. New ideas and discoveries were flooding the cultural environment in ways that inspired both artists and scientists. Although Einstein and Picasso never met or knew of each other's work, the social, scientific and intellectual milieus in which they lived led each to ideas in science and art which forced us to dramatically reconsider the very nature of reality. This course will explore the cultural and intellectual environments of the late 1800s, the lives of two revolutionary thinkers and the nature of their creativity, and how and why the revolutionary concepts E=mc2 and Cubism came within two years of each other in the early 1900s, ushering in the Modern Era.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 302
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
Caplin
iPhone Journalism
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Since most of us have cell phones that can take images, moving and still, can we all be citizen journalists just by being on the scene at a breaking story? What does that capability add to a news story? Can those images stand alone, or can they distort? Using more sophisticated equipment than the cell phone, some trained video journalists are freelancing and selling stories to news organizations. And news organizations themselves are hiring these “one man bands” to roam the world for a new more intimate, personal look at issues facing us. Can or should these journalists just set up an Instagram or Vimeo site and self distribute their stories? How important is editorial judgment for perspective on the issue at hand? This Writing Seminar will examine one of the newer trends in video journalism called "the one-man-band," and we'll go well beyond while examining the video news landscape.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 303
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Shister
Stewart & Colbert: Cool News
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Through no fault of their own, former Comedy Central late-night hosts Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have become media messiahs to a whole generation. How did Stewart’s ‘Daily Show’ and Colbert’s ‘Colbert Report,’ both created as faux-news parodies, gain legitimacy among the political elite? Why are they increasingly cited as primary news sources by Americans under 30? We will examine the unique satire of these insurrectionary ‘newsmen,’ as well as that of HBO's John Oliver and TBS's Samantha Bee, among others, and what it says about us as a culture. Or, as Colbert puts it, “I am America, and so can you!”

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 304
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Shister
Stewart & Colbert: Cool News
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Through no fault of their own, former Comedy Central late-night hosts Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have become media messiahs to a whole generation. How did Stewart’s ‘Daily Show’ and Colbert’s ‘Colbert Report,’ both created as faux-news parodies, gain legitimacy among the political elite? Why are they increasingly cited as primary news sources by Americans under 30? We will examine the unique satire of these insurrectionary ‘newsmen,’ as well as that of HBO's John Oliver and TBS's Samantha Bee, among others, and what it says about us as a culture. Or, as Colbert puts it, “I am America, and so can you!”

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 305
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Trench
DIY Etsy, Music, Fashion
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
From hacker culture to DIY (do it yourself!), we have countered global mass production with craft: grassroots creativity and invention. Recent research by sociologist and media studies expert David Gauntlett suggests that craft promotes individual happiness and social well-being by forging community. In our ever more interconnected world, online platforms like YouTube, SoundCloud, and Instagram, along with in-person groups from hackathons to knitting circles, allow us to exchange skills, collaborate, and share our creations. In this course, we will examine the social value of craft movements from the industrial era to the digital era, drawing on the fields of positive psychology, media studies, and the history of craft. We will also practice multiple genres of communication to gain new tools for connecting with the wider world. Finally, we will explore writing as a social act — by examining the idea of audience, and by sharing our work through peer reviews and presentations.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 306
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Trench
DIY Etsy, Music, Fashion
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
From hacker culture to DIY (do it yourself!), we have countered global mass production with craft: grassroots creativity and invention. Recent research by sociologist and media studies expert David Gauntlett suggests that craft promotes individual happiness and social well-being by forging community. In our ever more interconnected world, online platforms like YouTube, SoundCloud, and Instagram, along with in-person groups from hackathons to knitting circles, allow us to exchange skills, collaborate, and share our creations. In this course, we will examine the social value of craft movements from the industrial era to the digital era, drawing on the fields of positive psychology, media studies, and the history of craft. We will also practice multiple genres of communication to gain new tools for connecting with the wider world. Finally, we will explore writing as a social act — by examining the idea of audience, and by sharing our work through peer reviews and presentations.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 307
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Walker
Shaping Food Taste: How We Learn to Eat
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Few of us stop to consider how we learned to fulfill our very basic need for food. Yet historians, nutritionists, psychologists, and anthropologists tell us that there is nothing about the way we eat that is not conditioned by our culture. In this class, we will explore what the research indicates on how and why we eat what we do, as well as why our tastes dispose us towards certain foods rather than others. Sweet, salty, spicy—how do we learn to appreciate certain flavors, and why do why do we reject others? Everything from picky childhood eaters (chicken nuggets, anyone?) to the cultural differences that distinguish “Mediterranean” from “Asian” or “Southern” cuisine will be open to investigation. While this class focuses on a topic of relevance to us all and will touch on research from several different academic disciplines, the emphasis throughout will be on analysis, synthesis, and research.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 310
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Starner
Thinking Playfully
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
What do performance art, computer games, and sporting events have in common? They all rely on and activate the human capacity to think creatively and respond bodily to things that *aren’t* real. And yet for all its playfulness, play is serious business. In Play Matters, game designer Miguel Sicart uncovers the hidden role that the impulse to play plays in thinking of many different kinds. Through a series of reading and writing assignments in a variety of “real world” genres, this course will introduce students to the work being done at the intersection of technology studies and the cross-disciplinary study of play.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 311
MW 5:00pm-6:30pm
Caplin
iPhone Journalism
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Since most of us have cell phones that can take images, moving and still, can we all be citizen journalists just by being on the scene at a breaking story? What does that capability add to a news story? Can those images stand alone, or can they distort? Using more sophisticated equipment than the cell phone, some trained video journalists are freelancing and selling stories to news organizations. And news organizations themselves are hiring these “one man bands” to roam the world for a new more intimate, personal look at issues facing us. Can or should these journalists just set up an Instagram or Vimeo site and self distribute their stories? How important is editorial judgment for perspective on the issue at hand? This Writing Seminar will examine one of the newer trends in video journalism called "the one-man-band," and we'll go well beyond while examining the video news landscape.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 351
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Byland
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 352
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
Trench
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
BENNETT HALL 224
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 353
MW 5:00pm-6:30pm
Whitbeck
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 307
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 354
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Abbott
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
BENNETT HALL 231
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 355
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Paeth
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
BENNETT HALL 138
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as the "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg, exploring the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 356
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Gunn
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 4
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 357
TR 5:00pm-6:30pm
Kehayias
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 205
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 601
MW 5:30pm-7:00pm
Browning
Introduction to Critical Writing
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 316
Fulfills Part I of the two-part LPS Writing Requirement
This discipline and topic-based course will focus on the fundamentals of academic and professional writing with the goal of sharpening students’ reasoning and providing them with strategies for its effective expression. Through a series of short formal exercises, revisions, peer reviews, and timed writings, students will practice generating and expressing their own ideas in response to readings, collaborative exercises, and discussions about the course topic. Focus will be on the basics of critical writing: formulating and supporting propositions; reasoning and evidence; explanatory as well as justificatory reasoning. With an emphasis on rhetoric, students will learn how to write and revise for the various audiences they will encounter at Penn and beyond. Attention will also be paid to mechanics, usage, and style, as well as an introduction to citing and documenting sources. All elements of the seminar include guidance from an experienced instructor and feedback from fellow students to provide writers with the challenge of addressing diverse readers. The emphasis throughout is on creative thinking precisely expressed. (Part 1 of 2 part Critical Writing Sequence for LPS BA candidates)

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 602
TR 5:30pm-7:00pm
Kramer
Introduction to Critical Writing
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
BENNETT HALL 201
Fulfills Part I of the two-part LPS Writing Requirement
This discipline and topic-based course will focus on the fundamentals of academic and professional writing with the goal of sharpening students’ reasoning and providing them with strategies for its effective expression. Through a series of short formal exercises, revisions, peer reviews, and timed writings, students will practice generating and expressing their own ideas in response to readings, collaborative exercises, and discussions about the course topic. Focus will be on the basics of critical writing: formulating and supporting propositions; reasoning and evidence; explanatory as well as justificatory reasoning. With an emphasis on rhetoric, students will learn how to write and revise for the various audiences they will encounter at Penn and beyond. Attention will also be paid to mechanics, usage, and style, as well as an introduction to citing and documenting sources. All elements of the seminar include guidance from an experienced instructor and feedback from fellow students to provide writers with the challenge of addressing diverse readers. The emphasis throughout is on creative thinking precisely expressed. (Part 1 of 2 part Critical Writing Sequence for LPS BA candidates)

COGNITIVE SCIENCE
WRIT 031 301
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Kapadia-Bodi
Dreaming and Sleep
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
We know that sleep is vital to human health, both mental and physical. Science has told us that healthy sleep practices can combat chronic illness; that our age can determine when we fall asleep and for how long; and that our dreams are often connected to the problems of our waking lives. Similarly, whether one experiences insomnia or pulls regular all-nighters to study, we know that lack of sleep can be damaging to one’s health. In this seminar, we will dig deeper into the science of sleep, looking specifically at the connections between our sleeping and waking minds and examining the relationships between what we think (our beliefs), how we feel (our emotions), and how we sleep.

EDUCATION
WRIT 034 301
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
McWilliams
Nation of Immigrants
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
What does it mean to be considered a “foreigner”? How has the relationship between immigrants and the “American Dream” shifted over time? This writing seminar examines the politics of belonging in the contemporary American context be exploring the complex relationships between immigration, society, and identity in a rapidly globalizing world. We will untangle these connections through readings in history, anthropology, and film that will consider the role of public institutions and schools in the shaping of social citizenship, the plight of refugees in the current moment, and the role of race and religion in the crafting of “worthy” immigrant subjects.

EDUCATION
WRIT 034 302
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
McWilliams
Nation of Immigrants
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
What does it mean to be considered a “foreigner”? How has the relationship between immigrants and the “American Dream” shifted over time? This writing seminar examines the politics of belonging in the contemporary American context be exploring the complex relationships between immigration, society, and identity in a rapidly globalizing world. We will untangle these connections through readings in history, anthropology, and film that will consider the role of public institutions and schools in the shaping of social citizenship, the plight of refugees in the current moment, and the role of race and religion in the crafting of “worthy” immigrant subjects.

EDUCATION
WRIT 034 303
TR 4:30pm-6:00pm
McWilliams
Marketing Public Education
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In the last three decades, governments have turned to the private market to help improve access to high quality public education. Grounded in principles of competition and deregulation, “school choice” proponents believe that markets improve cost inefficiency and educational excellence. This seminar will analyze the tensions emergent from restructuring of public education, paying special attention to the implications of market fundamentalism for notions of citizenship, politics, and racial justice. We will then locate these tensions in contemporary issues around privatization and urban education reform through Maia Cucchiara’s Marketing Schools, Marketing Cities. In students’ research, they will tackle a set of paradoxes arising from the marketing of public education and analyze how we might achieve greater equity across race and class.

ECONOMICS
WRIT 037 301
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Osborn
Decision Making
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Do we need help choosing what to eat? How much to save for retirement? Whether to check the organ donor box at the DMV? Certain behavioral economists think so. This section will explore how everyone from urban planners to nutritionists to the Internal Revenue Service engages, knowingly or not, in design that influences everyday decisions. Fusing economics, psychology, public policy, and rhetoric, such "nudges" aim less to incentivize or discourage choices than gently encourage "better" habits for individuals and, in turn, society at large. The course will address questions of freedom, choice, and paternalism at the heart of Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sustein's bestselling book Nudge, with the broader goal of learning how we ourselves might become perceptive and influential in designed contexts we encounter each day.

ECONOMICS
WRIT 037 302
MW 5:00pm-6:30pm
Osborn
Decision Making
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Do we need help choosing what to eat? How much to save for retirement? Whether to check the organ donor box at the DMV? Certain behavioral economists think so. This section will explore how everyone from urban planners to nutritionists to hotel housekeeping to the Internal Revenue Service engages, knowingly or not, in design that influences everyday decisions. Fusing economics, psychology, public policy, and rhetoric, such "nudges" aim less to incentivize or discourage choices than gently encourage "better" habits for individuals and, in turn, society at large. The course will address questions of freedom, choice, and paternalism at the heart of Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sustein's bestselling book Nudge, with the broader goal of learning how we ourselves might become perceptive and influential in designed contexts we encounter each day.

ENGINEERING & APPLIED SCIENCE
WRIT 038 301
MW 5:00pm-6:30pm
Scheyder
Art of Engineering
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
How does invention really work in engineering? Engineers invent products and design processes, but the concept of the lone genius is largely a myth. Engineers participate in formal and informal communities of professionals and produce knowledge in a variety of ways. Using antilock braking systems (ABS) for passenger cars as a case study, Ann Johnson’s Hitting the Brakes. Engineering Design and the Production of Knowledge traces a more accurate representation of the circuitous path of invention. From 1930s patents to 21st century blog posts, the process of designing ABS has been more nuanced than one might think. Taught by a licensed Professional Engineer, this seminar will lead students through an exploration of engineering as a multifaceted endeavor. It will help students learn to identify and produce authentic genres of writing used in engineering and encourage them to enrich their understanding of the breadth of skills that successful participation in the field encompasses.

ENGLISH
WRIT 039 301
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Abbott
Modern Mysticism/Magick
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Witchcraft. Mysticism. Magick (with a k). Are these simply the stuff of entertainment, or something more? In our modern world, does the occult have a place? In your world as a student at Penn, is there a place for the mystical? Many scholars are fascinated with the various forms of occult theory and practice in human history, from their highly influential role in early times to their uneasy coexistence with modernism in recent times. Some theorize that even at our most logical and scientific, we still retain a primal connection to our magickal heritage. This course is about exploring the many kinds of mystical, magickal thinking that continue to influence our world. We’ll review thought-provoking scholarship on the subject and formulate ideas of our own. You’ll participate in collaborative exercises and write several works in different genres. Whether you’re a believer or a skeptic, if you have a sound intellect and an open mind, you’re perfect for this course!

ENGLISH
WRIT 039 302
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Byland
The Black Death
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Buboes. Plague Masks. Blood-letting. Leeches. These are some of the realities of the Black Death, which swept across Europe toward the end of the 14th century and killed nearly one third of the population. In some places, entire villages were decimated, leaving only cows and dogs to starve without their human companions. This class looks at the aftermath of the Plague in Europe. We will learn about the impact the Plague had on populations, religion, art, and politics. Our book, In the Wake of the Plague, by renowned historian Norman Cantor, offers both medieval and modern evidence for its conclusions. We will find that we’re still not done trying to understand one of the major catastrophes in human memory. Additionally, you will hone your writing skills by taking Cantor’s arguments apart and looking closely at how logical arguments are put together.

ENGLISH
WRIT 039 303
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Byland
The Black Death
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Buboes. Plague Masks. Blood-letting. Leeches. These are some of the realities of the Black Death, which swept across Europe toward the end of the 14th century and killed nearly one third of the population. In some places, entire villages were decimated, leaving only cows and dogs to starve without their human companions. This class looks at the aftermath of the Plague in Europe. We will learn about the impact the Plague had on populations, religion, art, and politics. Our book, In the Wake of the Plague, by renowned historian Norman Cantor, offers both medieval and modern evidence for its conclusions. We will find that we’re still not done trying to understand one of the major catastrophes in human memory. Additionally, you will hone your writing skills by taking Cantor’s arguments apart and looking closely at how logical arguments are put together.

HISTORY
WRIT 049 301
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Byala
Reinventing Africa
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
This course interrogates the multiple ways that “Africa” has been displayed both on the continent and elsewhere in the world. From museums to theme parks, from monuments to safaris, the invention and reinvention of Africa at different times and places has served different needs for different audiences. Using as its primary case study a text on the reimagining of the African past in post-apartheid South Africa, we will grapple with questions of memory, identity, and public commemoration, both in South Africa and beyond. Working through multiple genre-based writing assignments, we will focus on research, analysis, and synthesis, as well as tailoring our writing to the demands of different genres. Through peer review, group work, and class discussion, we will create a discourse community focused upon the ways in which display, memory, and commemoration impact our sense of the world.

HISTORY
WRIT 049 302
TR 4:30pm-6:00pm
Gunn
Financial Disasters in America
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
The ebb and flow of the market has caused global financial panics, ousted presidents, started wars, and put millions on the dole. At the center of every panic in American history has been consumer debt—and the failure to repay debt—leading some to dub the U.S. “a nation of deadbeats.” From Congressional fistfights over the gold standard to gunboat diplomacy in Peru, the history of financial panics is as enthralling as it is important. In this course, we’ll look at history’s losers as well as its winners, and we'll explore the following questions: What is the relationship between risk, doubt and debt? How does a crisis on Wall Street become a crisis on Main Street? What can financial panics tell us about contemporary America?

HISTORY
WRIT 049 303
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Gunn
Financial Disasters in America
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
The ebb and flow of the market has caused global financial panics, ousted presidents, started wars, and put millions on the dole. At the center of every panic in American history has been consumer debt—and the failure to repay debt—leading some to dub the U.S. “a nation of deadbeats.” From Congressional fistfights over the gold standard to gunboat diplomacy in Peru, the history of financial panics is as enthralling as it is important. In this course, we’ll look at history’s losers as well as its winners, and we'll explore the following questions: What is the relationship between risk, doubt and debt? How does a crisis on Wall Street become a crisis on Main Street? What can financial panics tell us about contemporary America?

HEALTH & SOCIETIES
WRIT 050 301
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Kapadia-Bodi
Illness Narratives
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
What stories do sick bodies tell? What do stories of suffering do for those who choose to listen? In this seminar, we will read Arthur Frank’s The Wounded Storyteller: Body, Illness, and Ethics as a means of examining the role of storytelling in the lives of those who are ill. Following Frank’s work gathering and analyzing the stories of people with cancer, chronic illness, and disability, we will ask questions about the ethics of suffering and the power of storytelling in everyday life.

HEALTH & SOCIETIES
WRIT 050 302
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Kapadia-Bodi
Illness Narratives
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
What stories do sick bodies tell? What do stories of suffering do for those who choose to listen? In this seminar, we will read Arthur Frank’s The Wounded Storyteller: Body, Illness, and Ethics as a means of examining the role of storytelling in the lives of those who are ill. Following Frank’s work gathering and analyzing the stories of people with cancer, chronic illness, and disability, we will ask questions about the ethics of suffering and the power of storytelling in everyday life.

MUSIC
WRIT 067 301
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Taylor
MUSIC AND THE BRAIN
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Each of us takes for granted the place of music in our lives. It helps us to focus while studying, keeps us running at a steady pace, and even changes our moods. Most people can harness these features of music, but few can say with any conviction how they operate. In this course, we will explore some of the possible solutions to the question: how does music impact the human mind? In looking for solutions, we will be aided by This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession, written by musician-cum-neuroscientist Daniel J. Levitin. Through analyzing this text we will gain insights into the functions of human music from the perspectives of neuroscience, philosophy, psychology, and biology.

NEAR EASTERN LANGUAGES & CIVLZT
WRIT 068 301
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Justl
Mummies, Pyramids & Pharaohs: Egypt in Popular Culture
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Hieroglyphs, magic, and buried treasures! Fascination with ancient Egypt has existed for millennia, with ancient Greeks and Romans even creating “Egyptianized” art and adopting Egyptian deities to their pantheon. Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt led to new archaeological discoveries like the Rosetta Stone and a revival of Egyptian architecture. The Victorian era was filled with mummy unwrapping parties and black market trade of artifacts robbed from tombs. The 1922 archaeological discovery of the undisturbed tomb of King Tutankhamun unleashed a frenzied wave of modern Egyptomania. Golden treasures, ancient curses, and the mysterious deaths of the tombs’ archaeologists proved irresistible. These discoveries inspired Egyptian motifs in New York’s Chrysler Building, authors like Agatha Christie, and movies like Cleopatra and The Mummy. And colossal Egyptian obelisks and sphinxes were even shipped across the Atlantic to display to the eager public of London and Philadelphia. This course links the study of ancient societies and modern experiences in a way that invites critical thought. Students will examine how archaeology and the ancient world inspire today’s media, art, architecture, and more.

PHILOSOPHY
WRIT 073 301
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Cauvin
Madness & Delusion
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
What’s the difference between a mistakenly held belief and a delusion? Is there a special connection between politics, religion, and delusional thinking? How do we distinguish delusional thinking from rational thinking? Delusions, by definition, hide from introspection. Thus, an interesting problem confronts the philosopher: how do I know I’m not delusional at this very moment? Philosophers have a-lot to say about rationality, but delusions themselves are curiously under-examined. This course is an introduction to the philosophy of delusion. We will read Jennifer Radden’s On Delusion in order to explore the relation between rationality and delusion, and the social life of falsely held beliefs.

PHILOSOPHY
WRIT 073 302
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Cauvin
Madness & Delusion
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
What’s the difference between a mistakenly held belief and a delusion? Is there a special connection between politics, religion, and delusional thinking? How do we distinguish delusional thinking from rational thinking? Delusions, by definition, hide from introspection. Thus, an interesting problem confronts the philosopher: how do I know I’m not delusional at this very moment? Philosophers have a-lot to say about rationality, but delusions themselves are curiously under-examined. This course is an introduction to the philosophy of delusion. We will read Jennifer Radden’s On Delusion in order to explore the relation between rationality and delusion, and the social life of falsely held beliefs.

PHILOSOPHY
WRIT 073 303
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Cauvin
Shaped by the Internet
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Can we imagine life without the internet? How has instantaneous access to information transformed the ways we think and feel? How have digital technologies reshaped social interactions and cultural norms? This course is an introduction to the philosophical perils and possibilities posed by the internet. We will read Hubert Dreyfus’ On the Internet to explore the ways the internet has transformed ideas of teaching and learning, the limits of embodiment, the relationship between anonymity and social responsibility, and perhaps paradoxically, our relationships to our bodies. Combining resources from history, philosophy, and information science, we will examine how the technology and infrastructure of the internet is transforming how think, feel, and manage our relationships and identities.

PHILOSOPHY
WRIT 073 304
MWF 12:00pm-1:00pm
Dunlap
Physics and Free Will
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Since the scientific revolution, there has been a tension between our belief that laws govern the physical world, and our belief that we have free will. If all physical systems are subject to the laws of nature, and we are physical systems, does that imply that our futures are predetermined by those laws? If we truly have free will, does this imply that we are not subject to the laws of nature, and therefore not (merely) physical systems? In this seminar, we will explore the relationship between our modern conception of what physics tells us about determinism, causation, and the nature of time, and the philosophical discussions of free will, self-identity, and autonomy.

PHYSICS
WRIT 074 301
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Dunlap
Time Travel
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Imagine you are in the final stages of developing the world’s first time machine, when, to your surprise, your future self appears and destroys all of your plans. If the time machine is never developed, how did you travel back from the future to interfere with your past self? This scenario is a version of the grandfather paradox, one of the many puzzling possibilities that seems to be raised when considering time travel. Incredibly, according to our best physical understanding of the universe, time travel is possible, although paradoxical situations like this must be impossible. How could that be true? In this seminar, we will explore the philosophical and physical underpinnings of the possibility of time travel, with a special eye towards attempting to resolve the paradoxes that seem to be engendered by that possibility.

PHYSICS
WRIT 074 302
MWF 1:00pm-2:00pm
Kehayias
Science & Politics
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
When you hear a politician speak, can you spot their rhetorical tools of oversimplifying, cherry-picking, demonizing, ridiculing, or just plain lying? Would it surprise you that they can take a scientific result that says one thing and distort it to argue its complete opposite, and convince people to vote against their own interests? In a time when facts seem to be in the eye of the beholder, decisions that affect our health and well-being are often made with purposefully twisted reasoning that perverts the work of scientists and truth itself. In this course we will look at the science and (mis)representations in the media and political circles of controversial issues like global warming, abortion, and immigration. We will arm ourselves with critical thinking, spotting fallacies, distortions, and outright lies in recent political statements and media coverage. We will learn how to properly question and when to trust what we are told, and what we can all do to preserve reality.

PHYSICS
WRIT 074 303
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Kehayias
Science & Politics
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
When you hear a politician speak, can you spot their rhetorical tools of oversimplifying, cherry-picking, demonizing, ridiculing, or just plain lying? Would it surprise you that they can take a scientific result that says one thing and distort it to argue its complete opposite, and convince people to vote against their own interests? In a time when facts seem to be in the eye of the beholder, decisions that affect our health and well-being are often made with purposefully twisted reasoning that perverts the work of scientists and truth itself. In this course we will look at the science and (mis)representations in the media and political circles of controversial issues like global warming, abortion, and immigration. We will arm ourselves with critical thinking, spotting fallacies, distortions, and outright lies in recent political statements and media coverage. We will learn how to properly question and when to trust what we are told, and what we can all do to preserve reality.

PHYSICS
WRIT 074 304
MW 5:00pm-6:30pm
Dunlap
Time Travel
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Imagine you are in the final stages of developing the world’s first time machine, when, to your surprise, your future self appears and destroys all of your plans. If the time machine is never developed, how did you travel back from the future to interfere with your past self? This scenario is a version of the grandfather paradox, one of the many puzzling possibilities that seems to be raised when considering time travel. Incredibly, according to our best physical understanding of the universe, time travel is possible, although paradoxical situations like this must be impossible. How could that be true? In this seminar, we will explore the philosophical and physical underpinnings of the possibility of time travel, with a special eye towards attempting to resolve the paradoxes that seem to be engendered by that possibility.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
WRIT 076 301
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
Hanley
Emotions and Politics
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In the aftermath of the 2016 Presidential election, one thing seems clear: American society is currently deeply divided. Protests have erupted across the country. Virulent language has been thrown back and forth by those on either side of the political spectrum. Is there a way to find common ground in such a divisive landscape? Using Hochschild’s Strangers in Their Own Land, this course looks at how understanding the role of emotions might help bridge this divide. Emotions play a major role in politics: consider the love of you have for your country, the hatred you harbor for the enemy, or even the fear you feel towards the future. Each represents an emotional reaction to something decidedly political, but these emotional resonances are not confined to one political position or another. Understanding how emotions operate in politics may teach us how to bridge the divide that currently punctuates American politics and society, regardless of where you sit on the political spectrum.

PSYCHOLOGY
WRIT 077 301
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Kwok
Morality in Babies
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Psychological research suggests that we are born with some moral understanding, such as the ability to distinguish between kindness and cruelty. When given the opportunity, one-year-olds will punish a “bad” puppet, and even three-month-olds show a preference for helpful cartoon characters over unhelpful ones. Other aspects of morality, it is argued, develop during one’s lifetime. In this class, we will consider various facets of morality, such as the feelings of empathy and compassion, understanding of fairness and punishment, in-groups and out-groups, and even disgust. We will examine the evidence of these moral faculties in babies, and the nature of the moral sense in adults.

RHETORIC AND WRITING STUDIES
WRIT 083 301
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
De Piero
Theories of Comedy
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Courtesy of the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon: “Switzerland is considering a new law that would give every adult in the country a guaranteed $2,800 a month without having to work. The United States has a program like that too—it’s called Congress.” Ba-dum, tssss! In Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Guide to Humor, John Morreall takes a philosophical approach to examining how humor has been theorized as an art form and a social tool. A range of fields like aesthetics, ethics, and psychology inform Morreall’s fundamental inquiry: what is comedy, and what is its value? What do we find funny, and why? We’ll put his hypotheses to the test by analyzing comedy across the media and throughout our everyday encounters. Prospective stand-up comics, this is your chance to gain some practice in deconstructing jokes while possibly working through some of your own material in the process.

RHETORIC AND WRITING STUDIES
WRIT 083 302
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
De Piero
Theories of Comedy
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Courtesy of the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon: “Switzerland is considering a new law that would give every adult in the country a guaranteed $2,800 a month without having to work. The United States has a program like that too—it’s called Congress.” Ba-dum, tssss! In Comic Relief: A Comprehensive Guide to Humor, John Morreall takes a philosophical approach to examining how humor has been theorized as an art form and a social tool. A range of fields like aesthetics, ethics, and psychology inform Morreall’s fundamental inquiry: what is comedy, and what is its value? What do we find funny, and why? We’ll put his hypotheses to the test by analyzing comedy across the media and throughout our everyday encounters. Prospective stand-up comics, this is your chance to gain some practice in deconstructing jokes while possibly working through some of your own material in the process.

RHETORIC AND WRITING STUDIES
WRIT 083 303
MWF 1:00pm-2:00pm
De Piero
How Leaders Talk: Political Speech and Tone
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Tone is a crucial component of American political discourse. It can bring citizens together and tear voters apart; it can sabotage compelling arguments and sell unlikely propositions. But what is tone, exactly? It depends on how we define it and how we measure it. In "Political Tone: How Leaders Talk and Why," the tonal speech patterns of Barack Obama, Sarah Palin, George W. Bush, and Bill Clinton are analyzed through five variables—certainty, optimism, activity, realism, and community—to determine how and why political tone shapes our perceptions. What types of political leaders are we drawn to, and why? How do Republicans and Democrats use tone in similar and different ways? Which tones tend to be evoked during national crises? This course will be a hybrid exploration of linguistics, rhetoric, communication, and sociology, with distinct implications for political science.

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY
WRIT 089 301
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Choi
Video Game Psychology
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Video games are big business. Be it studio blockbusters like Mass Effect, free-to-play apps like Candy Crush, or even the ever humble Pong, video games have infiltrated almost every aspect of our culture. Could it be that they have also infiltrated our brains? In this seminar, we will explore the psychology and economic theory of video games. With a multidisciplinary toolkit of cognitive science, marketing research, and a splash of humor, we will answer perennial questions, such as, "Why do people cheat with strategy guides?"; "Why do we keep getting excited about new loot?"; "Is it a problem that we like violence in video games?"; and, of course, "Do video games make you smarter?" This course is open to non-gamers, newbies, and eSports champs alike. No gaming console or Steam account required.

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY
WRIT 089 302
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Choi
Video Game Psychology
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Video games are big business. Be it studio blockbusters like Mass Effect, free-to-play apps like Candy Crush, or even the ever humble Pong, video games have infiltrated almost every aspect of our culture. Could it be that they have also infiltrated our brains? In this seminar, we will explore the psychology and economic theory of video games. With a multidisciplinary toolkit of cognitive science, marketing research, and a splash of humor, we will answer perennial questions, such as, "Why do people cheat with strategy guides?"; "Why do we keep getting excited about new loot?"; "Is it a problem that we like violence in video games?"; and, of course, "Do video games make you smarter?" This course is open to non-gamers, newbies, and eSports champs alike. No gaming console or Steam account required.

THEATER ARTS
WRIT 091 301
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Starner
Acting and the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Sometimes part of the fun of theater is imagining that you can peel back the performer’s mask or go inside an actor’s brain. With developments in cognitive neuroscience it’s now closer to being a reality than ever before. In this course, students will explore how characters and theatrical personae are created by studying the acting methods of the great actors, specific techniques they can use themselves for performances scripted or otherwise (onstage or off) and the latest brain science about personality and perception. Theatre scholar John Lutterbie’s Toward a General Theory of Acting will be our guide as we approach the craft of acting and the craft of writing using the insights of neuroscience.

THEATER ARTS
WRIT 091 302
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Starner
Acting and the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Sometimes part of the fun of theater is imagining that you can peel back the performer’s mask or go inside an actor’s brain. With developments in cognitive neuroscience it’s now closer to being a reality than ever before. In this course, students will explore how characters and theatrical personae are created by studying the acting methods of the great actors, specific techniques they can use themselves for performances scripted or otherwise (onstage or off) and the latest brain science about personality and perception. Theatre scholar John Lutterbie’s Toward a General Theory of Acting will be our guide as we approach the craft of acting and the craft of writing using the insights of neuroscience.

WRIT 130 601
MW 6:00pm-7:30pm
Johnson
Introduction to Research Writing
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Prerequisite(s): Must have completed Part I of the two-part LPS Writing Requirement
This discipline and topic-based course will build upon the knowledge and skills of writing reasoned discourse that are introduced in the introductory course. Students in the research writing seminar will acquire a substantial knowledge of a specialized topic in the designated discipline as they engage in individual guided research projects organized around the course topic and readings. The course will teach students how to engage in complex synthesis, building upon other’s ideas. A series of short research writing assignments will teach students how to develop keywords, write abstracts, literature overviews, explanations and arguments, as well as give them additional practice in writing clearly and concisely. Throughout students will learn how to formulate and stage a research paper, emulating techniques used by scholars and professionals. Continuing their instruction on rhetorical analysis, students will be introduced to reading and writing like a rhetorician, attending to specific audiences and how these are persuaded, from the word choice to the order, selection, and handling of evidence and documentation. Through a semester-long partnership and hands-on workshop with a library subject specialist, students will be given an introduction, immersion, and guided instruction in how, for example, to conduct stack searches, locate subject-specific databases, and engage in Boolean searches. By the end of the semester, students will be fluent in the basics of library research and writing, and will also have acquired, along the way, a substantial depth of knowledge about their course and research topic. As with Introduction to Critical Writing, emphasis throughout is on creative thinking precisely expressed. (Part 2 of 2 part Critical Writing Sequence for LPS BA candidates)

WRIT 130 603
TR 5:30pm-7:00pm
Johnson
Introduction to Research Writing
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Prerequisite(s): Must have completed Part I of the two-part LPS Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 202
Reserved for LPS Students
This discipline and topic-based course will build upon the knowledge and skills of writing reasoned discourse that are introduced in the introductory course. Students in the research writing seminar will acquire a substantial knowledge of a specialized topic in the designated discipline as they engage in individual guided research projects organized around the course topic and readings. The course will teach students how to engage in complex synthesis, building upon other’s ideas. A series of short research writing assignments will teach students how to develop keywords, write abstracts, literature overviews, explanations and arguments, as well as give them additional practice in writing clearly and concisely. Throughout students will learn how to formulate and stage a research paper, emulating techniques used by scholars and professionals. Continuing their instruction on rhetorical analysis, students will be introduced to reading and writing like a rhetorician, attending to specific audiences and how these are persuaded, from the word choice to the order, selection, and handling of evidence and documentation. Through a semester-long partnership and hands-on workshop with a library subject specialist, students will be given an introduction, immersion, and guided instruction in how, for example, to conduct stack searches, locate subject-specific databases, and engage in Boolean searches. By the end of the semester, students will be fluent in the basics of library research and writing, and will also have acquired, along the way, a substantial depth of knowledge about their course and research topic. As with Introduction to Critical Writing, emphasis throughout is on creative thinking precisely expressed. (Part 2 of 2 part Critical Writing Sequence for LPS BA candidates)

PEER TUTOR TRAINING
WRIT 135 401
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Ross
Peer Tutor Training and Fieldwork
Does not fulfill the writing requirement
Prerequisite(s): Fulfillment of Writing Requirement
Co-requisite(s): Permission of Director; Endorsement of Writing Instructor
This course is intended for capable writers who possess the maturity and temperament to work successfully as peer tutors at Penn. The course emphasizes the development of tutors' own writing through the process of collaborative peer-criticism, individual conferences, and intensive sessions on writing, from mechanics to style. The class meets twice weekly; tutors also work two hours weekly in the Writing Center or elsewhere, and confer regularly in small groups or one-on-one meetings with the instructor. Tutors are required to write five short papers, eight one-page peer reviews, and two responses to readings. Additionally, students keep a journal and give two class presentations. CWIC-affiliated course.

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