Critical Writing

Course descriptions

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CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 301
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Brown
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
BENNETT HALL 222
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 302
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Sadashige
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
VAN PELT LIBRARY 113
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 303
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Ngo
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
KELLY WRITERS HOUSE 203
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 304
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Byala
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
CWP description

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 305
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Ngo
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 306
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Brown
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
KELLY WRITERS HOUSE 202
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 307
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Ngo
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 216
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 308
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Walker
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 309
TR 5:00pm-6:30pm
Trench
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 310
MW 11:00am-12:30pm
Mohr
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 311
MW 11:00am-12:30pm
Wehner
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
TBD

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 312
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Argaman
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 313
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
Vellani
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

CRAFT OF PROSE
WRIT 002 314
MW 5:00pm-6:30pm
Argaman
Craft of Prose
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

GLOBAL ENGLISH
WRIT 011 301
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Kwok
Morality in Babies
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Psychological research suggests that we are born with some moral understanding, such as the ability to distinguish between kindness and cruelty. When given the opportunity, one-year-olds will punish a “bad” puppet, and even three-month-olds show a preference for helpful cartoon characters over unhelpful ones. Other aspects of morality, it is argued, develop during one’s lifetime. In this class, we will consider various facets of morality, such as the feelings of empathy and compassion, understanding of fairness and punishment, in-groups and out-groups, and even disgust. We will examine the evidence of these moral faculties in babies, and the nature of the moral sense in adults.

GLOBAL ENGLISH
WRIT 011 302
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Vellani
Global Cities
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 204
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY
This writing seminar examines the role of the city in the twenty-first century. In an increasingly urbanized world, the city has been portrayed as both a scourge and a panacea for humans. This writing seminar examines the phenomenon of the Global City with particular attention to why more and more cities wish to be defined as Global. What does 'Global' mean, and how is this designation measured and assigned? Readings in the seminar address a wide range of issues including spatial inequality, urban renewal, gentrification, and the economic and environmental challenges faced by cities.

GLOBAL ENGLISH
WRIT 011 303
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Choi
Video Game Psychology
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Video games are big business. Be it studio blockbusters like Mass Effect, free-to-play apps like Candy Crush, or even the ever humble Pong, video games have infiltrated almost every aspect of our culture. Could it be that they have also infiltrated our brains? In this seminar, we will explore the psychology and economic theory of video games. With a multidisciplinary toolkit of cognitive science, marketing research, and a splash of humor, we will answer perennial questions, such as, "Why do people cheat with strategy guides?"; "Why do we keep getting excited about new loot?"; "Is it a problem that we like violence in video games?"; and, of course, "Do video games make you smarter?" This course is open to non-gamers, newbies, and eSports champs alike. No gaming console or Steam account required.

GLOBAL ENGLISH
WRIT 011 304
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
Mohr
Global Health
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 215
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY
In most of the world, multiple therapeutic traditions co-exist, sometimes symbiotically and at others competitively. Many societies have radically different ideas and practices concerning health, the body and disease than in the US. And these ideas and practices are contested both within these societies and between different societies in an emerging global world. In this writing seminar, we will examine several contested topics within the field of medical anthropology in Haiti, Ghana, Eastern Europe, Japan, India, Southern Africa and the US: holistic versus ontological approaches towards disease, the politics of suffering, religious healing and contestation, the meaning(s) of organ donation, biomedicine under conditions of poverty, female circumcision, the ethics of clinical trials in the developing world, and finally, HIV/AIDS. This course is designed to improve students’ writing skills via peer review, multiple drafts and revisions of essays, and midterm and final portfolios.

GLOBAL ENGLISH
WRIT 011 305
MW 5:00pm-6:30pm
Staff
Global English
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY

ANTHROPOLOGY
WRIT 013 309
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Brown
The Business of Doing Good
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In recent years, public institutions and community organizations have come to rely less on the State for support, and more on the philanthropic donations of corporations and wealthy individuals. Schools, nonprofits and aid organizations, thus, are often beholden to the vision and mission of their funders. This course will focus on the contradictions between intentions and outcomes in corporate and individual charitable giving. Through readings in anthropology, political science and business, we will explore the ways in which philanthropy might serve to maintain class, race and gender inequality and inhibit democracy. In reading, writing and class discussions, we will ask: Does the marketing of people’s need to funders depend on narratives that perpetuate poverty, inequality and hardship? Are powerful corporations and individuals capable of being socially responsible? This course will improve students’ skills in research, critical reasoning and academic writing.

ANTHROPOLOGY
WRIT 013 311
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Kapadia-Bodi
Activism in Asian American Communities
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
The most familiar public image of the Asian American is the stereotypical image of the model minority: the studious, hardworking, quiet Asian who goes on to become a successful doctor,lawyer, or business person. This image has been particularly damaging to Asian American communities because it perpetuates the erasure of these communities’ varied histories, which include experiences with racial violence, refugee status, poverty, mental illness, political activism, and solidarity work. In this seminar, we will explore texts and other media focusing on Asian American experience in order to analyze images of Asian Americans, examine counternarratives, and better understand the histories and pathways to activism present in various Asian American communities.

ART HISTORY
WRIT 015 302
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Kramer
Art & Politics
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
For many, art IS politics. Whether in the service of the state during the Cold War, expressions of resistance during the Civil Rights, anti-war, and peace movements, or banners for queer, environmental and anti-globalization protest, art can be a high stakes enterprise. Art matters to artists and arts enthusiasts as well as to a variety of disciplines, including art history, cultural studies, philosophy, sociology, and urban studies. This course will focus upon American art in American contexts, exploring the scholarship on American political and public art from the 1940s to the present. Guided by Claudia Mesch’s _Art and Politics: A Small History of Art for Social Change since 1945_, we will explore how art performs within sociological, political, and cultural contexts.

ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES
WRIT 016 301
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Sadashige
Minorities and the Media
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Crosslisted with: FILM 009 403
Between the rise of high-profile directors such as Justin Lin and Steve McQueen and the emergence of television shows such as Blackish and Fresh Off the Boat, minorities have been changing the face of media both in front of and behind the camera. In this course we will explore how media by and about people of color across television, film, and short video impacts how we see ourselves, others, and the world at large. Students will also be given the opportunity to participate in events and programs related to the Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival (PAAFF).

BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF BEHAVIOR
WRIT 021 302
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Choi
Your Brain on Meditation
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Facebook posts, messenger notifications, Twitter feeds, not to mention emails, texts, and good ol' fashioned voicemails. We live in a digital age of distractions with so many tasks competing for our attention that all we're left with is depression, anxiety, and the eerie feeling that we've lost control of our own minds. But what if the solution to our modern illness was found by a man over two thousand years ago who decided to sit under a tree? In this seminar, we will uncover just what this man discovered and what science has to say about it. By blending ancient philosophy with cutting-edge neuroscience research, we will explore meditation in its many forms. Whether you think meditation is a clinically-tested exercise to reduce stress and increase mental health, or a powerful tool for spiritual liberation, in this course, you'll get the chance to study (and experience first-hand) your brain on meditation.

BIOLOGY
WRIT 022 301
MWF 11:00am-12:00pm
Manning
Animal Emotions
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
When our cat purrs in our lap, we might say, “He is content.” When our dog barks when we pet a friend’s dog, we might say, “She is jealous.” Is this mere anthropomorphizing—attributing human characteristics to non-human animals—or are the emotional lives of animals really as complex as humans? This course considers this question, and in doing so, we will broaden our scope to think about how the “animal question” has influenced contemporary critical and cultural theory. If the experiences of animals are as complex as human experience, how does that change our understanding of the human? Of the environment? In posing these questions, we will explore emerging lines of inquiry in the humanities like post-humanism, ecocriticism, and intersectionality. And we might even watch a cat video or two!

BIOLOGY
WRIT 022 302
MWF 12:00pm-1:00pm
Manning
Animal Emotions
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
When our cat purrs in our lap, we might say, “He is content.” When our dog barks when we pet a friend’s dog, we might say, “She is jealous.” Is this mere anthropomorphizing—attributing human characteristics to non-human animals—or are the emotional lives of animals really as complex as humans? This course considers this question, and in doing so, we will broaden our scope to think about how the “animal question” has influenced contemporary critical and cultural theory. If the experiences of animals are as complex as human experience, how does that change our understanding of the human? Of the environment? In posing these questions, we will explore emerging lines of inquiry in the humanities like post-humanism, ecocriticism, and intersectionality. And we might even watch a cat video or two!

CINEMA STUDIES
WRIT 025 303
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Sadashige
Our Animals, Our Selves
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
We have all heard that elephants never forget. But how many of us know that they also weep? Or that captive orcas can learn to "speak dolphin?" Scholars from areas as diverse as philosophy, biology, social justice, and the arts are currently formulating a new field: animal studies. These scholars are exploring how animals think, what they feel, and in some cases working with animal rights activists to question our laws and personal behaviors in light of these discoveries. In this course we will add to the conversation by looking at how popular culture - especially films like Blackfish and the Cove - reflect and shape our understanding of non-human animals.

CINEMA STUDIES
WRIT 025 304
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Nelson
The Vampire Film
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
The vampire has been a staple of horror films since the early days of cinema. Vampires, who prey on the living by literally sucking the life out of them, represent some of our deepest fears. Yet since the earliest vampire film, the vampire has also been a sexual threat and speaks to our subconscious fears and desires. Grotesque, hideous, and terrifying, the vampire is nonetheless a figure of our never-ending fascination. Why is the vampire such a lasting and enduring figure? In this course, we will trace a history of the vampire film by looking at the earliest surviving example of the genre, F. W. Murnau’s Nosferatu. We will examine the film, its background, and how contemporary audiences reacted to it. We will also consider how Nosferatu influenced later vampire films, and why it continues to haunt audiences today.

CLASSICAL STUDIES
WRIT 026 303
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Makins
Julius Caesar
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Gaius Julius Caesar may be the most famous Roman who ever lived. Thanks to sources as varied as Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, HBO’s Rome, and Caesar’s own memoirs, just about everyone knows something about him. For example, he was a brilliant general; Queen Cleopatra was his lover; he alienated the political establishment while garnering vast popular support; and he was assassinated in the Senate on the Ides of March. Yet the diverse images of Caesar in popular culture demonstrate that he is, and always has been, subject to wildly differing interpretations. How can we reconcile the Caesar of Napoleon with that of John Wilkes Booth, the Caesar of Mussolini’s Rome with that of the Las Vegas Strip? In this course, we will explore Caesar’s evolving significance in Western culture, gaining insight in the process into the enduring appeal of Rome as a cultural reference point—especially in times of crisis and challenge.

COMMUNICATIONS
WRIT 028 301
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
Wehner
Marketing of Likes
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Everywhere you look online, from YouTube to Yelp, rating systems and “Like” buttons abound. We live in a world where expressing preferences has never been so easy, or more public. And while we may believe that our tastes and opinions are our own, efforts to influence our likes have intensified in a networked society where these rating systems have economic consequences. Researchers in marketing, psychology, new media, and sociology have tried to explain the dynamics of our preferences, and in some cases, suggest how they might be shaped. In this course, we will explore what research indicates about how our likes are formed, change, and become part of a sharing economy. Along the way, we will look at everything from the food or music we favor, to how we express those likes and loathings online. We will consider both individual tastes and societal trends, from the neuroscience of why you like coffee to whether having wide-ranging tastes has become the new marker of social class.

COMMUNICATIONS
WRIT 028 302
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Osborn
Big Data Revolution
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
The terms "big data" and "analytics" abound in contemporary discourse, but few nonspecialists understand their purpose or promise beyond monetization of our clicks, content preferences, and geolocations. Alongside their overt commercial ends, analytics may also provide "insights" about who we are, what makes us tick, and how we might live productive, healthier, and even more fulfilling lives. This section will examine the rewards—and costs—of scaled data and their social utility with reference to MIT data scientist Alex Pentland's notion of "social physics," quantified expressions of how we interact, produce, consume, and relate with information from cat videos to stock tips. Equal parts technology, information studies, and social science, this section may also be of interest to anyone with a Facebook account or mobile device.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 301
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Caplin
Einstein and Picasso
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Fulfills the Writing Requirement The late 1800s-early 1900s was a rich period of time both in science and the arts. New ideas and discoveries were flooding the cultural environment in ways that inspired both artists and scientists. Although Einstein and Picasso never met or knew of each other's work, the social, scientific and intellectual milieus in which they lived led each to ideas in science and art which forced us to dramatically reconsider the very nature of reality. This course will explore the cultural and intellectual environments of the late 1800s, the lives of two revolutionary thinkers and the nature of their creativity, and how and why the revolutionary concepts E=mc2 and Cubism came within two years of each other in the early 1900s, ushering in the Modern Era.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 302
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
Caplin
Einstein and Picasso
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Fulfills the Writing Requirement The late 1800s-early 1900s was a rich period of time both in science and the arts. New ideas and discoveries were flooding the cultural environment in ways that inspired both artists and scientists. Although Einstein and Picasso never met or knew of each other's work, the social, scientific and intellectual milieus in which they lived led each to ideas in science and art which forced us to dramatically reconsider the very nature of reality. This course will explore the cultural and intellectual environments of the late 1800s, the lives of two revolutionary thinkers and the nature of their creativity, and how and why the revolutionary concepts E=mc2 and Cubism came within two years of each other in the early 1900s, ushering in the Modern Era.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 303
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Shister
Stewart-Colbert: Cool News
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Through no fault of their own, former Comedy Central late-night hosts Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have become media messiahs to a whole generation. How did Stewart’s ‘Daily Show’ and Colbert’s ‘Colbert Report,’ both created as faux-news parodies, gain legitimacy among the political elite? Why are they increasingly cited as primary news sources by Americans under 30? We will examine the unique satire of these insurrectionary ‘newsmen,’ as well as that of HBO's John Oliver and TBS's Samantha Bee, among others, and what it says about us as a culture. Or, as Colbert puts it, “I am America, and so can you!”

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 304
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Shister
Stewart & Colbert: Cool News
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Through no fault of their own, former Comedy Central late-night hosts Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have become media messiahs to a whole generation. How did Stewart’s ‘Daily Show’ and Colbert’s ‘Colbert Report,’ both created as faux-news parodies, gain legitimacy among the political elite? Why are they increasingly cited as primary news sources by Americans under 30? We will examine the unique satire of these insurrectionary ‘newsmen,’ as well as that of HBO's John Oliver and TBS's Samantha Bee, among others, and what it says about us as a culture. Or, as Colbert puts it, “I am America, and so can you!”

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 307
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Trench
DIY & Craft Movements
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
From hacker culture to DIY (do it yourself!), we have countered global mass production with craft: grassroots creativity and invention. Recent research by sociologist and media studies expert David Gauntlett suggests that craft promotes individual happiness and social well-being by forging community. In our ever more interconnected world, online platforms like YouTube, SoundCloud, and Instagram, along with in-person groups from hackathons to knitting circles, allow us to exchange skills, collaborate, and share our creations. In this course, we will examine the social value of craft movements from the industrial era to the digital era, drawing on the fields of positive psychology, media studies, and the history of craft. We will also practice multiple genres of communication to gain new tools for connecting with the wider world. Finally, we will explore writing as a social act — by examining the idea of audience, and by sharing our work through peer reviews and presentations.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 308
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Trench
DIY & Craft Movements
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
From hacker culture to DIY (do it yourself!), we have countered global mass production with craft: grassroots creativity and invention. Recent research by sociologist and media studies expert David Gauntlett suggests that craft promotes individual happiness and social well-being by forging community. In our ever more interconnected world, online platforms like YouTube, SoundCloud, and Instagram, along with in-person groups from hackathons to knitting circles, allow us to exchange skills, collaborate, and share our creations. In this course, we will examine the social value of craft movements from the industrial era to the digital era, drawing on the fields of positive psychology, media studies, and the history of craft. We will also practice multiple genres of communication to gain new tools for connecting with the wider world. Finally, we will explore writing as a social act — by examining the idea of audience, and by sharing our work through peer reviews and presentations.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 310
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Walker
Shaping Food Taste: How We Learn to Eat
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Few of us stop to consider how we learned to fulfill our very basic need for food. Yet historians, nutritionists, psychologists, and anthropologists tell us that there is nothing about the way we eat that is not conditioned by our culture. In this class, we will explore what the research indicates on how and why we eat what we do, as well as why our tastes dispose us towards certain foods rather than others. Sweet, salty, spicy—how do we learn to appreciate certain flavors, and why do why do we reject others? Everything from picky childhood eaters (chicken nuggets, anyone?) to the cultural differences that distinguish “Mediterranean” from “Asian” or “Southern” cuisine will be open to investigation. While this class focuses on a topic of relevance to us all and will touch on research from several different academic disciplines, the emphasis throughout will be on analysis, synthesis, and research.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 312
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Whitbeck
Reality TV
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Reality TV has been dubbed the “end” of scripted television, the guiltiest of guilty pleasures, and yet this media phenomenon continues to proliferate, leading to what some scholars have considered a fascinating, new “inter-generic space” with the power to redefine concepts of audience and authenticity, performance and voyeurism. Drawing on sociology, media studies, and cultural politics, will consider the range of recent reality TV productions, both in the U.S. and abroad, from talent competitions like American Idol and other "gamedocs," to "docusoaps" and reality sitcoms, with stops at every reviled and revered Kardashian and Big Brother contestant in between. As we become cannier, more critical viewers, we will also sharpen our research and writing skills by analyzing and practicing a variety of “real world” genres, such as cover letters, abstracts, and op-eds.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 314
TR 4:30pm-6:00pm
Whitbeck
Reality TV
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Reality TV has been dubbed the “end” of scripted television, the guiltiest of guilty pleasures, and yet this media phenomenon continues to proliferate, leading to what some scholars have considered a fascinating, new “inter-generic space” with the power to redefine concepts of audience and authenticity, performance and voyeurism. Drawing on sociology, media studies, and cultural politics, will consider the range of recent reality TV productions, both in the U.S. and abroad, from talent competitions like American Idol and other "gamedocs," to "docusoaps" and reality sitcoms, with stops at every reviled and revered Kardashian and Big Brother contestant in between. As we become cannier, more critical viewers, we will also sharpen our research and writing skills by analyzing and practicing a variety of “real world” genres, such as cover letters, abstracts, and op-eds.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 351
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Makins
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 352
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
Muka
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 353
MW 5:00pm-6:30pm
Whitbeck
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 354
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Abbott
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 355
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Kramer
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 356
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Paeth
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 357
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Gunn
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 358
TR 5:00pm-6:30pm
Makins
Secret Life of the Brain
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Open to upperclassmen who have not fulfilled their writing requirement.
In this course we will explore what neuroscientist David Eagleman refers to as "secret life of the brain," by which he means the massive engineering of our subconscious brain that which is busy at work beneath the conscious decisions we make everyday. Eagleman describes our conscious minds as just the tip of the iceberg as he explores the role of the brain in driving our behavior, thoughts, and experiences. In this course we will focus on the Eagleman's work as a launching point for our own research and writing.

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 601
MW 6:00pm-7:30pm
Kalin
Introduction to Critical Writing
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 24
Fulfills Part I of the two-part LPS Writing Requirement
This discipline and topic-based course will focus on the fundamentals of academic and professional writing with the goal of sharpening students’ reasoning and providing them with strategies for its effective expression. Through a series of short formal exercises, revisions, peer reviews, and timed writings, students will practice generating and expressing their own ideas in response to readings, collaborative exercises, and discussions about the course topic. Focus will be on the basics of critical writing: formulating and supporting propositions; reasoning and evidence; explanatory as well as justificatory reasoning. With an emphasis on rhetoric, students will learn how to write and revise for the various audiences they will encounter at Penn and beyond. Attention will also be paid to mechanics, usage, and style, as well as an introduction to citing and documenting sources. All elements of the seminar include guidance from an experienced instructor and feedback from fellow students to provide writers with the challenge of addressing diverse readers. The emphasis throughout is on creative thinking precisely expressed. (Part 1 of 2 part Critical Writing Sequence for LPS BA candidates)

CULTURAL STUDIES AND CRITICISM
WRIT 030 603
TR 5:30pm-7:10pm
Kramer
Introduction to Critical Writing
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 204
Fulfills Part I of the two-part LPS Writing Requirement
This discipline and topic-based course will focus on the fundamentals of academic and professional writing with the goal of sharpening students’ reasoning and providing them with strategies for its effective expression. Through a series of short formal exercises, revisions, peer reviews, and timed writings, students will practice generating and expressing their own ideas in response to readings, collaborative exercises, and discussions about the course topic. Focus will be on the basics of critical writing: formulating and supporting propositions; reasoning and evidence; explanatory as well as justificatory reasoning. With an emphasis on rhetoric, students will learn how to write and revise for the various audiences they will encounter at Penn and beyond. Attention will also be paid to mechanics, usage, and style, as well as an introduction to citing and documenting sources. All elements of the seminar include guidance from an experienced instructor and feedback from fellow students to provide writers with the challenge of addressing diverse readers. The emphasis throughout is on creative thinking precisely expressed. (Part 1 of 2 part Critical Writing Sequence for LPS BA candidates)

EDUCATION
WRIT 034 301
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Mcwilliams
Nation of Immigrants
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
What does it mean to be considered a “foreigner”? How has the relationship between immigrants and the “American Dream” shifted over time? This writing seminar examines the politics of belonging in the contemporary American context be exploring the complex relationships between immigration, society, and identity in a rapidly globalizing world. We will untangle these connections through readings in history, anthropology, and film that will consider the role of public institutions and schools in the shaping of social citizenship, the plight of refugees in the current moment, and the role of race and religion in the crafting of “worthy” immigrant subjects.

EDUCATION
WRIT 034 302
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Mcwilliams
Nation of Immigrants
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
What does it mean to be considered a “foreigner”? How has the relationship between immigrants and the “American Dream” shifted over time? This writing seminar examines the politics of belonging in the contemporary American context be exploring the complex relationships between immigration, society, and identity in a rapidly globalizing world. We will untangle these connections through readings in history, anthropology, and film that will consider the role of public institutions and schools in the shaping of social citizenship, the plight of refugees in the current moment, and the role of race and religion in the crafting of “worthy” immigrant subjects.

EDUCATION
WRIT 034 303
TR 4:30pm-6:00pm
Mcwilliams
Marketing Public Education
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In the last three decades, governments have turned to the private market to help improve access to high quality public education. Grounded in principles of competition and deregulation, “school choice” proponents believe that markets improve cost inefficiency and educational excellence. This seminar will analyze the tensions emergent from restructuring of public education, paying special attention to the implications of market fundamentalism for notions of citizenship, politics, and racial justice. We will then locate these tensions in contemporary issues around privatization and urban education reform through Maia Cucchiara’s Marketing Schools, Marketing Cities. In students’ research, they will tackle a set of paradoxes arising from the marketing of public education and analyze how we might achieve greater equity across race and class.

ECONOMICS
WRIT 037 301
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Osborn
Decision Making
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Do we need help choosing what to eat? How much to save for retirement? Whether to check the organ donor box at the DMV? Certain behavioral economists think so. This section will explore how everyone from urban planners to nutritionists to hotel housekeeping to the Internal Revenue Service engages, knowingly or not, in design that influences everyday decisions. Fusing economics, psychology, public policy, and rhetoric, such "nudges" aim less to incentivize or discourage choices than gently encourage "better" habits for individuals and, in turn, society at large. The course will address questions of freedom, choice, and paternalism at the heart of Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sustein's bestselling book Nudge, with the broader goal of learning how we ourselves might become perceptive and influential in designed contexts we encounter each day.

ECONOMICS
WRIT 037 302
MW 5:00pm-6:30pm
Osborn
Decision Making
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Do we need help choosing what to eat? How much to save for retirement? Whether to check the organ donor box at the DMV? Certain behavioral economists think so. This section will explore how everyone from urban planners to nutritionists to hotel housekeeping to the Internal Revenue Service engages, knowingly or not, in design that influences everyday decisions. Fusing economics, psychology, public policy, and rhetoric, such "nudges" aim less to incentivize or discourage choices than gently encourage "better" habits for individuals and, in turn, society at large. The course will address questions of freedom, choice, and paternalism at the heart of Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sustein's bestselling book Nudge, with the broader goal of learning how we ourselves might become perceptive and influential in designed contexts we encounter each day.

ENGINEERING & APPLIED SCIENCE
WRIT 038 301
MW 5:00pm-6:30pm
Scheyder
What Drives Engineering
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
How does invention really work in engineering? Engineers invent products and design processes, but the concept of the lone genius is largely a myth. Engineers participate in formal and informal communities of professionals and produce knowledge in a variety of ways. Using antilock braking systems (ABS) for passenger cars as a case study, Ann Johnson’s Hitting the Brakes. Engineering Design and the Production of Knowledge traces a more accurate representation of the circuitous path of invention. From 1930s patents to 21st century blog posts, the process of designing ABS has been more nuanced than one might think. Taught by a licensed Professional Engineer, this seminar will lead students through an exploration of engineering as a multifaceted endeavor. It will help students learn to identify and produce authentic genres of writing used in engineering and encourage them to enrich their understanding of the breadth of skills that successful participation in the field encompasses.

ENGLISH
WRIT 039 301
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Abbott
Comics & Graphic Novels
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Comics today comprise many types of expression with one thing in common: words and pictures working together to convey a story or message. Originating, some say, hundreds of years ago, but taking off in modern form in the early twentieth century, comics have been used to tell jokes, weave tales of fantasy and adventure, make political and social commentary, and more. And in the last two or three decades, the study of comics and graphic novels has blossomed into a lively academic discipline. This seminar is an inquiry into what defines the art of comics, how it functions, and what modern audiences can derive from it. We will read examples of the art, from comic strips to graphical novels and manga, spanning more than a hundred years, and we’ll also read scholarly literature on the subject. Students will participate in collaborative exercises, write several works in different genres, and prepare portfolios of their work.

ENGLISH
WRIT 039 302
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Abbott
Modern Mysticism/Magick
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Witchcraft. Mysticism. Magick (with a k). Are these simply the stuff of entertainment, or something more? In our modern world, does the occult have a place? In your world as a student at Penn, is there a place for the mystical? Many scholars are fascinated with the various forms of occult theory and practice in human history, from their highly influential role in early times to their uneasy coexistence with modernism in recent times. Some theorize that even at our most logical and scientific, we still retain a primal connection to our magickal heritage. This course is about exploring the many kinds of mystical, magickal thinking that continue to influence our world. We’ll review thought-provoking scholarship on the subject and formulate ideas of our own. You’ll participate in collaborative exercises and write several works in different genres. Whether you’re a believer or a skeptic, if you have a sound intellect and an open mind, you’re perfect for this course!

ENGLISH
WRIT 039 303
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Taransky
Writing by the Numb3rs
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In this course, we will learn about contemporary writers who do not separate the humanities from the sciences; the left brain from the right brain; or inspiration, creativity and expression, from data, logic, and rules. Writers experimenting at the intersections of creative writing and mathematics will help us examine how, and why, these two fields of inquiry are so often divided--and what can happen when we bring them together. Do you find yourself obsessing over your next move in Words with Friends? Do you like palindromes ("was it a cat I saw", "now I won," rotator, sagas, civic) and anagrams (dormitory, dirty room)? If so, you are probably already engaged in the practice of “Writing by the Numb3rs," and in this class you will be in good company.

ENGLISH
WRIT 039 304
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Taransky
Writing by the Numb3rs
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In this course, we will learn about contemporary writers who do not separate the humanities from the sciences; the left brain from the right brain; or inspiration, creativity and expression, from data, logic, and rules. Writers experimenting at the intersections of creative writing and mathematics will help us examine how, and why, these two fields of inquiry are so often divided--and what can happen when we bring them together. Do you find yourself obsessing over your next move in Words with Friends? Do you like palindromes ("was it a cat I saw", "now I won," rotator, sagas, civic) and anagrams (dormitory, dirty room)? If so, you are probably already engaged in the practice of “Writing by the Numb3rs," and in this class you will be in good company.

ENGLISH
WRIT 039 305
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Taransky
Uncreative Writing
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
We often think of creative writing as an expressions of the author's creativity, but writers have long been creating poems and novels using appropriative techniques including cutting, copying and pasting, Google searches, court testimony and other mechanized methods. In this writing seminar, we will read and discuss these works alongside Kenneth Goldsmith's collection of critical essays *Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age,* which describes the history and practice of conceptual art, from artists and writers including Andy Warhol, Marcel Duchamp, Sol LeWitt, Ezra Pound, Walter Benjamin and James Joyce, to current practitioners. Through exercises, workshops, peer review, and revision, we will, like the writers and readers Goldsmith describes, "define new roles for the writer [and] reconsider what writing is." Our investigations will allow us to challenge concepts of identity, to consider the position of originality in poetry and fiction, and examine the roles of writer and reader in this "digital age."

ENGLISH
WRIT 039 309
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Paeth
Chick Lit and Postfeminism
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
What exactly is “chick lit”? Is it the literary equivalent of cotton candy or just a label to apply to something written by a woman? What kind of “chicks” get to be the subject of this “lit”: can or should these texts claim to speak for all women, or do they only speak for a narrow segment of the population? What do we make of the genre’s dominant narratives of cities, consumerism, and courtship? In our quest to answer these questions and more, we’ll consider texts including Sex and the City, Bridget Jones’s Diary, and Kavita Daswani’s For Matrimonial Purposes. We will also turn our critical gaze to current media representations of women in blogs and magazines. What does chick lit reveal about gender, race and power in American culture?

ENGLISH
WRIT 039 311
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Paeth
Chick Lit and Postfeminism
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
What exactly is “chick lit”? Is it the literary equivalent of cotton candy or just a label to apply to something written by a woman? What kind of “chicks” get to be the subject of this “lit”: can or should these texts claim to speak for all women, or do they only speak for a narrow segment of the population? What do we make of the genre’s dominant narratives of cities, consumerism, and courtship? In our quest to answer these questions and more, we’ll consider texts including Sex and the City, Bridget Jones’s Diary, and Kavita Daswani’s For Matrimonial Purposes. We will also turn our critical gaze to current media representations of women in blogs and magazines. What does chick lit reveal about gender, race and power in American culture?

HISTORY
WRIT 049 301
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Byala
Africa on Display
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
This course interrogates the multiple ways that “Africa” has been displayed both on the continent and elsewhere in the world. From museums to theme parks, from monuments to safaris, the invention and reinvention of Africa at different times and places has served different needs for different audiences. Using as its primary case study a text on the reimagining of the African past in post-apartheid South Africa, we will grapple with questions of memory, identity, and public commemoration, both in South Africa and beyond. Working through multiple genre-based writing assignments, we will focus on research, analysis, and synthesis, as well as tailoring our writing to the demands of different genres. Through peer review, group work, and class discussion, we will create a discourse community focused upon the ways in which display, memory, and commemoration impact our sense of the world.

HISTORY
WRIT 049 302
TR 4:30pm-6:00pm
Gunn
Financial Disasters in America
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
The ebb and flow of the market has caused global financial panics, ousted presidents, started wars, and put millions on the dole. At the center of every panic in American history has been consumer debt—and the failure to repay debt—leading some to dub the U.S. “a nation of deadbeats.” From Congressional fistfights over the gold standard to gunboat diplomacy in Peru, the history of financial panics is as enthralling as it is important. In this course, we’ll look at history’s losers as well as its winners, and we'll explore the following questions: What is the relationship between risk, doubt and debt? How does a crisis on Wall Street become a crisis on Main Street? What can financial panics tell us about contemporary America?

HISTORY
WRIT 049 303
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Gunn
Financial Disasters in America
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
The ebb and flow of the market has caused global financial panics, ousted presidents, started wars, and put millions on the dole. At the center of every panic in American history has been consumer debt—and the failure to repay debt—leading some to dub the U.S. “a nation of deadbeats.” From Congressional fistfights over the gold standard to gunboat diplomacy in Peru, the history of financial panics is as enthralling as it is important. In this course, we’ll look at history’s losers as well as its winners, and we'll explore the following questions: What is the relationship between risk, doubt and debt? How does a crisis on Wall Street become a crisis on Main Street? What can financial panics tell us about contemporary America?

HEALTH & SOCIETIES
WRIT 050 301
MWF 1:00pm-2:00pm
Muka
Science Denialism
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In Western scientific practice, we are taught that truth and knowledge can be assured through the use of the 'scientific method' and carefully controlled laboratory experimentation or environmental observation. However, what happens when shared understandings of scientific truth break down and scientific knowledge is called into question? Throughout the 20th century, public and private communities have pushed back against scientific findings and created doubt in public debates about the epistemological basis of science. Secondhand smoke, acid rain, ozone depletion, and climate change have all resulted in public questioning of scientific veracity. Scientific denialism is on the rise. This course will examine the history of scientific denialism and what this history can tell us about the current state of scientific debate.

HEALTH & SOCIETIES
WRIT 050 302
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Muka
Medical Genetics
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Today, we think little when we hear that something is ‘genetic’. Conversations about specific genetic conditions (such as tay-sachs and down’s syndrome) have blended in everyday discourse with a looser understanding of what is attributable to the omnipresent and omnipotential ‘gene’. However, the idea of genetics and the ease with which we talk about this topic is relatively new. Before the 1950s, neither doctors nor the public spoke in terms of genes- illnesses could have a host of sources, many shrouded in mystery and attributed to a host of mythical or mystical causes. The rise of biomedicine, and the acceptance made genetics more wipe spread in the medical community, but the acceptance of genetics into everyday medical discourse took much longer. Between 1950 and the present, genetic medicine went from a relatively young field to a commonplace way of understanding human disease and wellness. This class explores the history and current status of ‘medical genetics’

MUSIC
WRIT 067 301
TR 9:00am-10:30am
Taylor
MUSIC AND THE BRAIN
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Each of us takes for granted the place of music in our lives. It helps us to focus while studying, keeps us running at a steady pace, and even changes our moods. Most people can harness these features of music, but few can say with any conviction how they operate. In this course, we will explore some of the possible solutions to the question: how does music impact the human mind? In looking for solutions, we will be aided by This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession, written by musician-cum-neuroscientist Daniel J. Levitin. Through analyzing this text we will gain insights into the functions of human music from the perspectives of neuroscience, philosophy, psychology, and biology.

NEAR EASTERN LANGUAGES & CIVLZT
WRIT 068 301
TR 1:30pm-3:00pm
Justl
Egyptomania
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Hieroglyphs, magic, and buried treasures! Fascination with ancient Egypt has existed for millennia, with ancient Greeks and Romans even creating “Egyptianized” art and adopting Egyptian deities to their pantheon. Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt led to new archaeological discoveries like the Rosetta Stone and a revival of Egyptian architecture. The Victorian era was filled with mummy unwrapping parties and black market trade of artifacts robbed from tombs. The 1922 archaeological discovery of the undisturbed tomb of King Tutankhamun unleashed a frenzied wave of modern Egyptomania. Golden treasures, ancient curses, and the mysterious deaths of the tombs’ archaeologists proved irresistible. These discoveries inspired Egyptian motifs in New York’s Chrysler Building, authors like Agatha Christie, and movies like Cleopatra and The Mummy. And colossal Egyptian obelisks and sphinxes were even shipped across the Atlantic to display to the eager public of London and Philadelphia. This course links the study of ancient societies and modern experiences in a way that invites critical thought. Students will examine how archaeology and the ancient world inspire today’s media, art, architecture, and more.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
WRIT 076 301
TR 4:30pm-6:00pm
Hanley
Emotions and Politics
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
In the aftermath of the 2016 Presidential election, one thing seems clear: American society is currently deeply divided. Protests have erupted across the country. Virulent language has been thrown back and forth by those on either side of the political spectrum. Is there a way to find common ground in such a divisive landscape? Using Hochschild’s Strangers in Their Own Land, this course looks at how understanding the role of emotions might help bridge this divide. Emotions play a major role in politics: consider the love of you have for your country, the hatred you harbor for the enemy, or even the fear you feel towards the future. Each represents an emotional reaction to something decidedly political, but these emotional resonances are not confined to one political position or another. Understanding how emotions operate in politics may teach us how to bridge the divide that currently punctuates American politics and society, regardless of where you sit on the political spectrum.

PSYCHOLOGY
WRIT 077 302
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Kwok
Morality in Babies
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Psychological research suggests that we are born with some moral understanding, such as the ability to distinguish between kindness and cruelty. When given the opportunity, one-year-olds will punish a “bad” puppet, and even three-month-olds show a preference for helpful cartoon characters over unhelpful ones. Other aspects of morality, it is argued, develop during one’s lifetime. In this class, we will consider various facets of morality, such as the feelings of empathy and compassion, understanding of fairness and punishment, in-groups and out-groups, and even disgust. We will examine the evidence of these moral faculties in babies, and the nature of the moral sense in adults.

PSYCHOLOGY
WRIT 077 303
TR 3:00pm-4:30pm
Kwok
The Science of Creativity
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Picasso, Einstein, Steve Jobs -- three of the individuals, among many others, who have been proclaimed to be "creative" geniuses. In this course, we will examine how we define creativity and the factors that make a person more or less creative. As we explore the scientific study of creativity, we will consider its relationship to personality, motivation, and intelligence. We will ask whether creativity has a dark side. We will discuss emerging psychological theories of creativity, learn about research in this developing field, and explore the ways researchers have used the methods of science to answer questions about creativity.

RHETORIC AND WRITING STUDIES
WRIT 083 301
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
Browning
Sports Scandals
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Sports at every level are haunted by controversies, but none are more hotly debated than those at the college and professional levels. During the Rio Olympics, for example, the media focused more on Russia’s doping scandals and on the testing of female athletes for “sex verification” purposes than on medal counts. Indeed, in the last two years we have seen debates over: the "Deflategate" saga; the FIFA corruption scandal; the name of Washington DC’s football team; whether fantasy sports qualify as gambling; how concussion prevention strategies should fit into football regulations; questionable recruiting practices by college teams and boosters; and how professional athletes’ private lives should be governed by their employers when it comes it issues like assault. Using as our course text Testing for Athlete Citizenship by Kathryn E. Henne, in this writing seminar you will develop your rhetorical and logical reasoning skills by exploring debates at the intersections of elite sports, ethics, controversial rules and regulations, the media, and the language we use when we talk about the athletes at the heart of these scandals.

RHETORIC AND WRITING STUDIES
WRIT 083 302
MWF 12:00pm-1:00pm
Staff
How Leaders Talk: Political Speech and Tone
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Tone is a crucial component of American political discourse as well as our everyday lives. It can bring us together and tear us apart; it can sabotage compelling arguments and sell unlikely ones. But what is tone, exactly? It depends on how we define it and how we measure it. In Political Tone: How Leaders Talk and Why, the tonal speech patterns of Barack Obama, Sarah Palin, George W. Bush, and Bill Clinton are analyzed through five variables—certainty, optimism, activity, realism, and community—to determine how and why political tone shapes our perceptions. What types of political leaders are we drawn to, and why? How do Republicans and Democrats use tone in similar and different ways? Which tones tend to be evoked during national crises? This course will be a hybrid exploration of linguistics, rhetoric, communication, and sociology, with distinct implications for political science.

RHETORIC AND WRITING STUDIES
WRIT 083 303
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
De Piero
Zombie Nouns and Style
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Watch out, shouts Helen Sword! The world of academic writing is under attack by an unstoppable force of zombie nouns! We’ve got to put the human back in the humanities and the universe back in the university if we want to reclaim the beauty of language! Sword took a hard look at academic discourse and wondered, “why do universities […] churn out so much uninspiring, cookie-cutter prose?” It boils down to style, she says, and her heavily research-based text, Stylish Academic Writing, examines the numerous roles of style in the vast world of academic writing. Throughout her analysis, she integrates practical strategies for how we can bring more style to our own work, from crafting clearer sentences to incorporating curious anecdotes. As we apply her tips, we’ll also consider the rhetorical reasons for academic jargon and why disciplinary differences exist in the first place.

RHETORIC AND WRITING STUDIES
WRIT 083 303
MW 2:00pm-3:30pm
De Piero
Zombie Nouns and Style
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Watch out, shouts Helen Sword! The world of academic writing is under attack by an unstoppable force of zombie nouns! We’ve got to put the human back in the humanities and the universe back in the university if we want to reclaim the beauty of language! Sword took a hard look at academic discourse and wondered, “why do universities […] churn out so much uninspiring, cookie-cutter prose?” It boils down to style, she says, and her heavily research-based text, Stylish Academic Writing, examines the numerous roles of style in the vast world of academic writing. Throughout her analysis, she integrates practical strategies for how we can bring more style to our own work, from crafting clearer sentences to incorporating curious anecdotes. As we apply her tips, we’ll also consider the rhetorical reasons for academic jargon and why disciplinary differences exist in the first place.

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY
WRIT 089 302
TR 12:00pm-1:30pm
Choi
Video Game Psychology
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Video games are big business. Be it studio blockbusters like Mass Effect, free-to-play apps like Candy Crush, or even the ever humble Pong, video games have infiltrated almost every aspect of our culture. Could it be that they have also infiltrated our brains? In this seminar, we will explore the psychology and economic theory of video games. With a multidisciplinary toolkit of cognitive science, marketing research, and a splash of humor, we will answer perennial questions, such as, "Why do people cheat with strategy guides?"; "Why do we keep getting excited about new loot?"; "Is it a problem that we like violence in video games?"; and, of course, "Do video games make you smarter?" This course is open to non-gamers, newbies, and eSports champs alike. No gaming console or Steam account required.

URBAN STUDIES
WRIT 092 301
MW 3:30pm-5:00pm
Argaman
A World of Cities
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
For the first time in human history, more than half of all the people on earth now live in cities. From bursting megacities like Rio de Janeiro and Mumbai, to rising city-states like Dubai and Singapore, to financial powerhouses like London, New York, and Tokyo, the world’s economy, politics, and ecological future depend, increasingly, on what happens in cities. In this class, we will investigate this new reality in depth: What makes cities grow and thrive, and what makes them fail? What is causing the world-wide growth of slums, and what, if anything, can be done about it? Will growing cities be an ecological disaster, or a green opportunity? And ultimately, we will ask whether this new wave of urbanization means for humanity’s future. Students will improve their analytic and narrative writing abilities, use case studies of individual cities, and focused writing assignments to develop and articulate well-informed opinions about a complex, real-world topic without cut-and-dry answers.

WRIT 130 601
MW 5:30pm-7:00pm
Elliott
Introduction to Research Writing
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Prerequisite(s): Must have completed Part I of the two-part LPS Writing Requirement
WILLIAMS HALL 316
Reserved for LPS Students
This discipline and topic-based course will build upon the knowledge and skills of writing reasoned discourse that are introduced in the introductory course. Students in the research writing seminar will acquire a substantial knowledge of a specialized topic in the designated discipline as they engage in individual guided research projects organized around the course topic and readings. The course will teach students how to engage in complex synthesis, building upon other’s ideas. A series of short research writing assignments will teach students how to develop keywords, write abstracts, literature overviews, explanations and arguments, as well as give them additional practice in writing clearly and concisely. Throughout students will learn how to formulate and stage a research paper, emulating techniques used by scholars and professionals. Continuing their instruction on rhetorical analysis, students will be introduced to reading and writing like a rhetorician, attending to specific audiences and how these are persuaded, from the word choice to the order, selection, and handling of evidence and documentation. Through a semester-long partnership and hands-on workshop with a library subject specialist, students will be given an introduction, immersion, and guided instruction in how, for example, to conduct stack searches, locate subject-specific databases, and engage in Boolean searches. By the end of the semester, students will be fluent in the basics of library research and writing, and will also have acquired, along the way, a substantial depth of knowledge about their course and research topic. As with Introduction to Critical Writing, emphasis throughout is on creative thinking precisely expressed. (Part 2 of 2 part Critical Writing Sequence for LPS BA candidates)

WRIT 130 602
TR 5:30pm-7:00pm
Browning
Introduction to Research Writing
Fulfills the Writing Requirement
Prerequisite(s): Must have completed Part I of the two-part LPS Writing Requirement
This discipline and topic-based course will build upon the knowledge and skills of writing reasoned discourse that are introduced in the introductory course. Students in the research writing seminar will acquire a substantial knowledge of a specialized topic in the designated discipline as they engage in individual guided research projects organized around the course topic and readings. The course will teach students how to engage in complex synthesis, building upon other’s ideas. A series of short research writing assignments will teach students how to develop keywords, write abstracts, literature overviews, explanations and arguments, as well as give them additional practice in writing clearly and concisely. Throughout students will learn how to formulate and stage a research paper, emulating techniques used by scholars and professionals. Continuing their instruction on rhetorical analysis, students will be introduced to reading and writing like a rhetorician, attending to specific audiences and how these are persuaded, from the word choice to the order, selection, and handling of evidence and documentation. Through a semester-long partnership and hands-on workshop with a library subject specialist, students will be given an introduction, immersion, and guided instruction in how, for example, to conduct stack searches, locate subject-specific databases, and engage in Boolean searches. By the end of the semester, students will be fluent in the basics of library research and writing, and will also have acquired, along the way, a substantial depth of knowledge about their course and research topic. As with Introduction to Critical Writing, emphasis throughout is on creative thinking precisely expressed. (Part 2 of 2 part Critical Writing Sequence for LPS BA candidates)

PEER TUTOR TRAINING
WRIT 135 401
TR 10:30am-12:00pm
Ross
Peer Tutor Training and Fieldwork
Does not fulfill the writing requirement
Prerequisite(s): Fulfillment of Writing Requirement
Co-requisite(s): Permission of Director; Endorsement of Writing Instructor
This course is intended for capable writers who possess the maturity and temperament to work successfully as peer tutors at Penn. The course emphasizes the development of tutors' own writing through the process of collaborative peer-criticism, individual conferences, and intensive sessions on writing, from mechanics to style. The class meets twice weekly; tutors also work two hours weekly in the Writing Center or elsewhere, and confer regularly in small groups or one-on-one meetings with the instructor. Tutors are required to write five short papers, eight one-page peer reviews, and two responses to readings. Additionally, students keep a journal and give two class presentations. CWIC-affiliated course.

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