Freshman Seminars for Fall 2017
< Courses & Registration

While not required, freshman seminars are an excellent introduction to academic life in the College and are highly recommended for first- or second-semester students. The primary goal of the freshman seminar program is to provide every freshman with the opportunity for a direct personal encounter with a faculty member in a small class setting devoted to a significant intellectual endeavor. Freshman seminars also fulfill College General Education Requirements. Below is the list of the freshman seminars offered in Fall 2017.

Desire and Demand
Marilynne Diggs-Thompson, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Anthropology and House Dean, Riepe College House 
Does consumption shape culture or does culture shape consumption? As even the most mundane purchase becomes socially symbolic and culturally meaningful we can persuasively argue that the concept of "need" has been transformed. Analyzing a variety of physical and virtual consumer venues, the goal of this seminar is to understand and to analyze historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. We investigate social and political-economic factors that impact when and how people purchase goods and argue that behavior attached to consumption includes a nexus of influences that may change periodically in response to external factors. Readings and research assignments are interdisciplinary and require a critical analysis of global/local linkages. The city of Philadelphia becomes the seminar's laboratory as we ask how have issues of culture, consumption, and global capitalism become intertwined around the world?
ANTH 086 301
MUNIVERSITY MUSEUM330

Fulfills: Sector I: Society  |  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

Architecture in the Anthropocene
Daniel Barber, Assistant Professor of Architecture 
This course will use architecture and the built environment as a lens to investigate the emerging field of the environmental humanities. Our goal will be to analyze and understand these new intellectual frameworks in order to consider the relationship between global environmental challenges and the process of constructing the built environment. As such, we will oscillate between social and political theory, environmental history, and architectural history and theory. Issues of importance will include: theories of risk, the role of nature in political conflicts; images, design and environmental communication; and the relationship between speculative design and other narratives of the future. These conceptual frameworks will be read alongside examples of related creative projects in art, literature, and architecture, and will be amplified through presentations and discussions with studio faculty and other visitors to the course.
ARCH 111 301
MWMEYERSON HALLB7

Fulfills: Sector IV: Humanities & Social Sciences

Villa Garden and Villa Life
Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture 
This seminar will study the idea of villeggiature (villa life) and the ideology associated with countryside gardens and plantations. In an examination of the circularity of villa ideology across the centuries, other themes will emerge that address the relationship between urban and rural life, between architecture and natural environment and between social, cultural, economic, and political forces and landscape design. These themes will be explored through the study of selected villas and through the reading of sources drawn from villa literature, including architectural and agricultural treatises, epistolary exchanges, and drawings.
ARCH 112 301
MWFISHER-BENNETT HALL406

Fulfills: Sector IV: Humanities & Social Sciences

The Ecology of Art
Aaron Levy, Senior Lecturer in the History of Art and in English and Executive Director of the Slought Foundation 
This course will examine the fascination with ecology in artistic thinking from late Modernism to the present, with a particular attention to the developing interest in social and environmental systems in the late 1960's and early 1970's. From Robert Smithton's Spiral Jetty to Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, artists, scholars and activists of this generation were deeply invested in the interconnectedness of life in all its forms. This new sensitivity to the affinities that bind individuals, and our vulnerability to social, political and economic environments, enabled new aesthetic approaches that have continued relevance today. As part of the course, we will meet with a range of artists, curators and institutions in Philadelphia who are continuing these investigations, including the Colored Girls Museum in Germantown and the Health Ecologies Lab here at Penn. No familiarity with contemporary art is required.
ARTH 100 401 | CIMS 016 401 | ENGL 016 401 | URBS 106 401
TMEYERSON HALLB4

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters

Neurobiology of Brain Disorders
Marc Dichter, Professor of Neurology 
The human brain is clearly the most complicated and magical organ in the body. We don't completely understand how it works, but we do know, unfortunately, for a variety of reasons, the human brain is prone to failure, either by acute injury, chronic degeneration, genetic flaws in its composition, or unknown disturbances in its behavior. Diseases of the brain can take many forms but are all uniformly devastating for individuals, families, and our society, and are also very costly. This course will explore the ways in which various brain disorders (both neurological and psychiatric) manifest themselves and discuss their underlying neurobiological mechanisms. In addition, the social and economic impact of these diseases on society will be considered, as well as some well publicized political issues surrounding many on these brain disorders.
BIBB 030 301
TRGODDARD LAB102

Fulfills: Sector V: Living World

Brain Changes Through Tragedy and Triumph
Jacqueline Cunningham, Pediatric Neuropsychologist Emeritus,The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia 
There are currently major advances in understanding how the brain works. Whereas sixty years ago, it was believed that the mature brain was a fixed structure, new research shows not only that the brain can change, but also that it changes continuously throughtout life. An overview of neuroplasticity, as it refers to change in the nervous system, will be presented in this course. Major topics will regard: an introduction to the brain anatomy necessary in explanations of neuroplastic changes that occur in response to the nerve injury and brain damage; a consideration of addiction and pain as conditions involving maladaptive forms of neuroplasticity; and an overview of lifelong brain changes illustrating neuroplasticity as a lifelong process.
BIBB 080 301
MWLEIDY LAB109

Fulfills: Sector V: Living World

Structural Biology & Genomics
Ponzy Lu, Professor of Chemistry 
Structural biology is the scientific method of describing, predicting and changing the properties of living organisms, including humans, based on “complete” genome chemical structures (sequence) and 3-dimensional structures of cellular components. The intellectual and technical revolutions that occurred during the 20th century made this possible. It is today's approach to understanding biology and solving problems in medicine. We will discuss how macroscopic biological properties, such as reproduction, locomotion and viral infection, are determined by the physics and chemistry of proteins and nucleic acids. Changes in biological function, in hereditary diseases like cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia, result from minute changes in individual proteins. Much larger changes in genome and protein structure are often tolerated without consequence. Understanding and exploiting these phenomena at the molecular level is the basis of new technology in the agricultural, energy and drug industries. The broad range of medical, social and political problems associated with the advances will be considered. We will attempt to distinguish real progress from fads and fashion. In addition to several books, there is a weekly reading assignment from Science, Nature and the Tuesday New York Times. This is a two-semester seminar with 0.5 credit unit each semester of the academic year.
CHEM 022 301
TRCHEMISTRY BUILDINGB13

Fulfills: Sector VII: Natural Sciences & Mathematics

Modern Sci-fi Cinema
Christopher Donovan, House Dean, Gregory College House 
Science Fiction has been a cinematic genre for as long as there has been cinema—at least since Georges Melies’s visionary Trip to the Moon in 1902. However, though science fiction films have long been reliable box office earners and cult phenomena, critical acknowledgement and analysis were slow to develop. Still, few genres reflect the sensibility of their age so transparently—if often unconsciously—or provide so many opportunities for filmmakers to simultaneously address social issues and expand the lexicon with new technologies. Given budgetary considerations and the appetite for franchises, science fiction auteurs face a difficult negotiation between artistic expression and lowest common denominator imperatives, the controversy over Terry Gilliam’s Brazil (1985) being perhaps the most infamous example. Nevertheless, many notable filmmakers have done their most perceptive and influential work in the scifi realm, including Gilliam, Ridley Scott, David Cronenberg, Paul Verhoeven, James Cameron and Alfonso Cuaron. This course will survey the scope of contemporary science fiction cinema, after looking first at seminal works like Metropolis (1927) and 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) that continue to cast their shadow over the genre. We will then devote considerable time to a pair of more modern films, Scott’s Alien (1979) and Blade Runner (1982), which drew from earlier movements (German expressionism, noir), influenced new ones (cyberpunk) and inspired a rare wave of academic discourse. Over the course of the term we will sample smaller, more independent-minded projects, such as Michel Gondry’s Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) and Spike Jonze’s Her (2013) as well as higher profile but much more risky epics from filmmakers such as Steven Spielberg and Christopher Nolan.
CIMS 016 301
MWFISHER-BENNETT HALL16

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters

A Cinema We Couldn't Refuse: Italians in American Film
Frank Pellicone, House Dean, Harrison College House 
In the 1880’s the development of motion pictures heralded the rise of a new visual art that would not only shape but ultimately control the collective imagination of our nation. At the same time Italians left their home country in unprecedented numbers so that between 1880 and 1920 over four million Italians entered into the United States. As the film industry developed, the sudden influx of Italians offered a backdrop on which to project the changing views of the nation. Beginning with silent films, such as The Sheik with Rudolph Valentino, we will consider the ways that Hollywood exploited the Italian diaspora to develop a stock of familiar characters including hot-blooded lotharios, ruthless gangsters, wily tricksters, and lovable losers with which we have become familiar. We will review the history of the Italian immigrant experience and simultaneously examine the development of the American film industry, ultimately to consider the ways that Italian images on screen projected the fears, desires, anxieties, and struggles of a growing American psyche.
CIMS 016 302
TRHARRISON COLLEGE HOUSEM20

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters

Plato's Republic
Peter Struck, Professor of Classical Studies 
In classical Athens the question of how a government should work was an urgent one. They invented democracy, adopted it successfully for decades, and then it faced challenges, from oligarchs and others. At this time of tumult, the philosopher Plato set out to explore the question of the best form of government by framing it as a question of justice. Which mode of governing is the one that delivers justice? But to understand this question, a person first needs to understand what justice itself is. Coming up with an answer to this is a thorny and difficult prospect. By focusing on Platos Republic, this course aims to explore how best to govern a society, what kinds of qualities one should expect in a leader, and how these questions are connected to very basic understandings about human nature, society, and the world in general.
CLST 005 401 | PHIL 010 401
TRCLAUDIA COHEN HALL204

Fulfills: Sector II: History & Tradition

Rome & America
Campbell Grey, Associate Professor of Classical Studies 
This course explores a range of social structures and contexts, cultural understandings and intellectual practices where the influence of Roman exemplars is discernible in both historical and present-day America. It presents students with Roman and American materials placed in explicit or implicit dialog with one another: e.g., descriptions and discussions of political processes and structures; attitudes towards games, public entertainments, and communal cohesion; rhetorics and vocabularies of public space. Among other tasks and projects, students will stage a 'reimagination' of the Constitutional (Philadelphia) Convention of 1787, which resulted in the United States Constitution. They will also emulate ancient moralists and satirists, who attacked Rome's 'Bread and Circuses' culture, by focusing their attention upon comparable practices in modern America.
CLST 029 301
TRNEW COLLEGE HOUSE110

Fulfills: Sector II: History & Tradition

Copyright and Culture
Peter Decherney, Professor of English 
In this course, we will look at the history of copyright law and explore the ways that copyright has both responded to new media and driven art and entertainment. How, for example, is a new medium (photography, film, the Internet, etc.) defined in relation to existing media? What constitutes originality in collage painting, hip hop music, or computer software? What are the limits of fair use? And how have artists, engineers and creative industries responded to various changes in copyright law? A major focus of the course will be the lessons of history for the current copyright debates over such issues as file sharing, online video, and remix culture.
ENGL 015 401 | CIMS 015 401
TRFISHER-BENNETT HALL140

Fulfills: Sector IV: Humanities & Social Sciences

Arts and Nature
Rebecca Bushnell, Professor of English 
In this course, we will explore many ways in which the arts have both represented and literally shaped the natural world. Nature features abundantly in books, paintings, sculpture, photography, music, and literature, but also in not so obvious media (e.g., a daisy on a dress, a lion-head door knocker). The arts have also physically constructed the natural world in, for example, environmental art, landscape architecture, and gardening. Once you start looking, you will see this interplay everywhere. While the core of this course will be readings about the history and theory of the arts’ interactions with nature, our explorations will take us on the road outside of the classroom to (among other places) Penn’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology; the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts; and the Morris Arboretum. Beyond Penn, we will visit the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Bartram’s Garden, and the Academy of Natural Sciences. Students will undertake individual projects focused on both the readings and the objects/landscapes discovered (which could combine creative and critical work, as well as weekly writing assignments).
ENGL 016 301
TVAN PELT LIBRARY629

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters

Counterfictions
Paul Saint-Amour, Professor of English 
What if the Confederacy had won the Civil War? What if F.D.R. had been assassinated in 1933—or if J.F.K. had not been assassinated in 1963? What if, in 1940, Charles Lindbergh had won the U.S. presidency, made a treaty with Hitler, and begun putting in place a series of anti-Semitic laws and federal programs? Or what if, after World War II, Jewish refugees and survivors of the Holocaust had settled not in the Holy Land but in Sitka, Alaska? All fiction asks "what if?" But different kinds of fiction pose the question differently, at different scales and with different stakes. In this freshman seminar we'll make a close study of counterfictions—novelistic thought experiments about worlds in which some decisive historical event turned out otherwise than it did in "our" timeline. We'll think about these novels historically, considering what they meant in their original cultural contexts. We'll think about them formally, asking what counterfictions tell us about realism, plotting, protagonism, and fictionality. We'll compare, contrast, and connect these novels to the use of counterfactual reasoning by lawmakers and historians. And we'll examine the hunger for alternate-history narratives in our own moment, discussing their power variously to warn and numb, to awaken and flatter and console. Readings by Katharine Burdekin, Octavia Butler, Michael Chabon, Philip K. Dick, Robert Harris, Ward Moore, Kim Stanley Robinson, Philip Roth, and others.
ENGL 016 302
MWFISHER-BENNETT HALL139

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters

Contact and Conflict: Literatures of Israel and Palestine
Amy Kaplan, Professor of English 
The Palestinian/Israeli conflict is a subject of international headlines and intense controversy. This course introduces major Israeli and Palestinian novelists and poets, whose writing reveals the interior lives of individuals, communities, and social movements behind the slogans captured in the news. The course explores how Palestinians and Israelis have narrated personal and collective stories to create a sense of identity, locate a place in history, and express longing for a homeland. Our discussions will contrast representations of common themes: loss and memory, exile and refugee, war and occupation, oppression and resistance. Readings include memoirs, novels, reportage, and poetry in English translation, and students who can read Hebrew or Arabic are welcome. Authors include Yehuda Amichai, Mahmoud Darwish, David Grossman, Emile Habiby, Ghassan Kanafani, Sahar Khalifeh, Amos Oz, Anton Shammas, A. B. Yehoshua, S. Yizhar. Assignments consist of one collaborative oral report, weekly responses to the readings, and two written essays.
ENGL 016 303
TRFISHER-BENNETT HALL323

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters  |  Cross Cultural Analysis

The Fantastic Voyage From Homer to Science Fiction
Scott Francis, Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 
Tales of voyages to strange lands with strange inhabitants and even stranger customs have been a part of the Western literary tradition from its inception. What connects these tales is that their voyages are not only voyages of discovery, but voyages of self-discovery. By describing the effects these voyages have on the characters who undertake them, and by hinting at comparisons between the lands described in the story and their own society, authors use fantastic voyages as vehicles for incisive commentary on literary, social, political, and scientific issues. In this course, we will explore the tradition of the fantastic voyage from Homer’s Odyssey, one of the earliest examples of this type of narrative and a model for countless subsequent voyage narratives, to science fiction, which appropriates this narrative for its own ends. We will determine what the common stylistic elements of voyage narratives are, such as the frame narrative, or story-within-a-story, and what purpose they serve in conveying the tale’s messages. We will see how voyagers attempt to understand and interact with the lands and peoples they encounter, and what these attempts tell us about both the voyagers and their newly-discovered counterparts. Finally, we will ask ourselves what real-world issues are commented upon by these narratives, what lessons the narratives have to teach about them, and how they impart these lessons to the reader. Readings for this course, all of which are in English or English translation, range from classics like the Odyssey and Gulliver’s Travels to predecessors of modern science fiction like Jules Verne and H. G. Wells to seminal works of modern science fiction like Pierre Boulle’s Planet of the Apes, Karel Čapek’s War with the Newts, and Stanislaw Lem’s Solaris. Though this course is primarily dedicated to literature, we will also look at how films like the 1968 adaptation of Planet of the Apes and television shows like Star Trek, Red Dwarf,and Futurama draw upon literary or cinematic models for their own purposes. This course is meant not only for SF fans who would like to become better acquainted with the precursors and classics of the genre, but for all those who wish to learn how great works of fiction, far from being intended solely for entertainment and escapism, attempt to improve upon the real world through the effect they have on the reader.
FREN 200 401 | COML 200 401
TRWILLIAMS HALL705

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters

Bad Taste
Catriona Macleod, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor of German 
“Beauty is not a quality inherent in things: it only exists in the mind of the beholder” (David Hume). Most of us can recognize bad taste as soon as we see it: Harlequin romances, Elvis on black velvet, lawn ornaments. But bad taste also has a history, and kitsch has been identified as a peculiarly modern invention related to capitalism and consumerism. Beginning with a discussion of taste in the eighteenth century, we will investigate under what conditions good taste can go bad, for example when it is the object of mass reproduction, and, on the other hand, why bad taste in recent times has increasingly been viewed in positive terms. Categories such as the cute, the sentimental, the popular, the vulgar, the miniature, kitsch, and camp will be explored. We will also ask what forms of ideological work have been done by this brand of aesthetics, for example in the connection between politics and kitsch, femininity and the “low-brow,” or camp and queer identity. Writers and film-makers to be discussed include: Hume, Kant, Goethe, Flaubert, Bourdieu, Sacher-Masoch, Thomas Mann, Nabokov, Benjamin, Greenberg, Sontag, John Waters.
GRMN 011 301
TWILLIAMS HALL201RWILLIAMS HALL202

Fulfills: Sector I: Society

Euro Zone Crisis - The EU in a Currency War For Survival?
Susanne Shields, Lecturer in German Language and Culture 
“Let me put it simply… there may be a contradiction between the interests of the financial world and the interests of the political world…. We cannot keep constantly explaining to our voters and our citizens why the taxpayer should bear the cost of certain risks and not those people who have earned a lot of money from taking those risks.” Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, at the G20 Summit, November 2010 In January 1999, a single monetary system united Germany, a core nation, with 10 other European states. Amidst the optimism of the euro’s first days, most observers forecast that Europe would progress toward an ever closer union. Indeed, in the ensuing decade, the European Union became the world's largest trading area, the euro area expanded to include 17 member states, and the Lisbon Treaty enhanced the efficiency and democratic legitimacy of the Union. In 2009, Greece’s debt crisis exposed deep rifts within the European Union and developed into a euro zone crisis – arguably the most difficult test Europe has faced in the past 60 years. After two years of a more benign EURO debt situation, the risk of recession, EU sanctions against Russia, and a possible collision of a newly-elected Greek government with its creditors, the euro crisis returned with a vengeance in 2015. In addition, the pressure mounts for European leaders to find a solution to the refugee crisis which reached a peak in the fall of 2015. In 2016 the Brexit delivered the latest blow to the European Union, and the future of the European project without the UK looks bleak. The Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) is still fragile, and economic and political developments in 2017 could determine the future of the euro. Does the EU have what it takes to emerge from these crises? Will the European nations find a collective constructive solution that will lead to a fiscal union that implies further integration? At a time when Germany is increasingly expected to provide leadership to prevent the collapse of the EU, the goal of this seminar is to explore how and why the euro zone has arrived at the situation in which it now finds itself, and to consider how major European euro and non-euro members see the consequences of the crisis for their own role in the EU and what role the United States has to play in the future of the euro zone. Two major issues, the complexity of decision-making within the EU and the challenges to forming a European identity, further compound the issue. Studying different perspectives, the goal is to stimulate thinking about if and how different national identities of European member states and varying political, economic, and cultural climates still pose major obstacles to potential solutions to the crisis.
GRMN 027 301
TRCLAUDIA COHEN HALL392

Fulfills: Sector I: Society

Inquisitors, Heretics and Witches
Ada Kuskowski, Assistant Professor of History 
When and why did medieval European Christians develop anxieties about the beliefs of others, and what did they do to grapple with this anxiety? This course will explore the development of ideas of right and wrong belief in medieval Europe, and the various concerns and practical reactions that developed in response. We will begin by examining how notions of orthodoxy and its concomitant deviations developed from late Antiquity to the medieval period. We will then turn to the criminalization of the latter and development of the “inquisitors of heretical depravity," individuals assigned by the pope to inquire into heresy, and the various methods they used to identify and punish those they considered to hold wrong belief. Combining the zeal of faith with the power of law, inquisitio was Europe's most infamous institution and co-opted judicial procedure in the fight against heresy. Ultimately the course aims to provide a deeper understanding of the development of orthodoxy, dissent, intolerance and persecution.
HIST 101 302
TRVAN PELT LIBRARY605

Fulfills: Sector II: History & Tradition

History and Human Nature
Michael Zuckerman, Professor of History, Emeritus 
Feith Family Seminar

In this seminar, we will take up the topic of human nature as a gambit for establishing common ground and stimulating a deeper intellectual community among incoming University Scholars. Or perhaps we will work the other way round. Perhaps we will draw upon that deeper community as a way of enriching our conversation as we take up the perennially challenging topic of human nature. Either way, we will engage in a wide-ranging reconnaissance of major theories on the topic. We will examine conceptions of humankind drawn from such disciplines as economics, psychology, religion, literature, linguistics, anthropology, and philosophy. Lurking behind all of our endeavor will be questions of time and place, questions, if you will, of history; is human nature best understood as constant or contingent, stable or changeful with time and circumstance? We should have a lot of fun. (Open only to first year students in the University Scholars Program.)In this seminar, we will take up the topic of human nature as a gambit for establishing common ground and stimulating a deeper intellectual community among incoming University Scholars. Or perhaps we will work the other way round. Perhaps we will draw upon that deeper community as a way of enriching our conversation as we take up the perennially challenging topic of human nature. Either way, we will engage in a wide-ranging reconnaissance of major theories on the topic. We will examine conceptions of humankind drawn from such disciplines as economics, psychology, religion, literature, linguistics, anthropology, and philosophy. Lurking behind all of our endeavor will be questions of time and place, questions, if you will, of history; is human nature best understood as constant or contingent, stable or changeful with time and circumstance? We should have a lot of fun. (Open only to first year students in the University Scholars Program.)
HIST 104 301
WARTS, RSRCH & CULTR - 3601 LO200

Fulfills: Sector IV: Humanities & Social Sciences

Why College? Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
Jonathan Zimmerman, Professor of History of Education 
This course will explore controversies and dilemmas surrounding American colleges, from their birth into the present. What is the purpose of “college”? How have these goals and objectives changed, across time and space? What should college do, and for whom? And how can colleges be reformed to meet their diverse purposes and constituencies? Topics of discussion will include affirmative action, “political correctness,” fraternities and sororities, sexual assault and safety, online education, and the recent trend towards “college for all.”
HIST 104 302
MWEDUCATION BUILDING427

Fulfills: Sector II: History & Tradition

Africa in World History
Lee Cassanelli, Associate Professor of History 
This seminar examines Africa's connections--economic, political, intellectual and cultural--with the wider world from ancient times to the 21st century, drawing on a diverse sample of historical sources. It also explores Africa's place in the imaginations of outsiders, from ancient Greeks to modern-day development "experts." Whether you know a lot or almost nothing about the continent, the course will get you to rethink your stereotypes and to question your assumptions about the importance of Africa in world history.
HIST 106 301
MWFISHER-BENNETT HALL224

Fulfills: Sector II: History & Tradition  |  Cross Cultural Analysis

Snip and Tuck: A History of Surgery
Beth Linker, Associate Professor of History and Sociology of Science 
Before the discovery of anesthesia in the nineteenth century, surgery was often a grizzly and horrific affair, inevitably involving extreme pain. Surgeons had a reputation as dirty, blood-thirsty "barbarians," and patients rarely sought out their services. But all of this changed during the twentieth century. Today surgery is one of the most prestigious medical specialties, and patients-especially those who long to look younger, thinner, and trimmer-voluntarily submit to multiple procedures. This course will investigate the cultural and scientific sources of these dramatic changes, with readings ranging from graphic descriptions of "bonesetting" and suturing during the Middle Ages to contemporary accounts of childbirth and plastic surgery in antiseptic hospitals and clinics.
HSOC 042 301
TCLAUDIA COHEN HALL337

Fulfills: Sector II: History & Tradition

Medical Missionaries and Partners
Kent Bream, Assistant Professor of Clinical Family Medicine and Community Health 
Global health is an increasingly popular goal for many modern leaders. Yet critics see evidence of a new imperialism in various aid programs. We will examine the evolution over time and place of programs designed to improve the health of underserved populations. Traditionally categorized as public health programs or efforts to achieve a just society, these programs often produce results that are inconsistent with these goals. We will examine the benefits and risks of past programs and conceptualize future partnerships on both a local and global stage. Students should expect to question broadly held beliefs about the common good and service. Ultimately we will examine the concept of partnership and the notion of community health, in which ownership, control, and goals are shared between outside expert and inside community member.
HSOC 059 301
WHARNWELL COLLEGE HOUSEM10

Fulfills: Sector I: Society

Politics: Rhetoric and Power in Italian Culture and Beyond
Alessandra Mirra, Visiting Scholar in Italian Studies 
Italian political thought is tightly interlaced with literature, poetry and fiction. Many renowned writers, such as Dante and Machiavelli, were primarily considered political authors rather than literary icons, and their writings influenced and shaped political discourse in Italy and across Western culture. Their work is still of great interest for the Humanities, the Social and Political sciences, History, and Philosophy. In this course, we will examine the work of these authors, focusing on different genres (from poetry to political treatises, satire, and theater) and paying special attention to the language they employed to convey their innovative political views. We will frame these works within their historical and literary context, but also in relation to today's politics. At the center of those works, there are many themes of great current interest, such as the division of Church and State, the relationship between the State and its citizens, the separation of powers into three branches, the death penalty, and the rhetorical strategies employed by politicians running for power and by their opponents. Readings will include, among others, works by Dante, Machiavelli, Vico, Beccaria, Leopardi, D’Annunzio, Pasolini, Gentile and Gramsci.
ITAL 100 401 | COML 107 401
MWFFISHER-BENNETT HALL201

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters

Proving Things: Analysis
Julius Shaneson, Professor of Mathematics 
This course focuses on the creative side of mathematics, with an emphasis on discovery, reasoning, proofs and effective communication, while at the same time studying real and complex numbers, sequences, series, continuity, differentiability and integrability. Small class sizes permit an informal, discussion-type atmosphere, and often the entire class works together on a given problem. Homework is intended to be thought-provoking, rather than skill-sharpening.
MATH 202 301
TRDAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB3C6


Beethoven's 9th Symphony
Lawrence Bernstein, Professor of Music, Emeritus 
On 5 May 1824, Ludwig van Beethoven mounted the podium at the Kärntnerthor Theater in Vienna to conduct the premiere of his Ninth Symphony. His decision to do so was ill-advised, to say the least. Beethoven was totally deaf. The performance was held together—to the extent that it was at all—through the efforts of a second conductor who led from within the orchestra. Beethoven was still conducting well after the music had ended, and he had to be turned around physically to acknowledge the applause of the audience. The performance must have been a shambles. Nonetheless, beginning with the moment its final notes died away, the Ninth Symphony transformed the music of the Western world and became a major monument of its culture. The melody to which Beethoven set Friedrich Schiller’s “Ode to Joy” is now the anthem of the European Union. One can witness performances of the symphony on Japanese soccer fields with choruses of 10,000. In 1989, when Germany was reunited after the fall of the Berlin Wall, it was a performance of the Ninth Symphony that celebrated the moment. In this seminar, we shall study Beethoven’s Ninth in detail, examining it in the context of the symphony of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Among the topics to be probed are the premiere, Schiller’s ode and what it meant to Beethoven, how the composer met the challenge of pacing a symphony that (for the first time) lasted for well over an hour, and the qualities of the work that led to its iconic position in the history of Western music.
MUSC 016 301
MWLERNER CENTER (MUSIC BUILDING102

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters

Music in Urban Spaces
Molly McGlone, Assistant Dean for Advising 
Music in Urban Spaces explores the ways in which individuals use music in their everyday lives and how music is used to construct larger social and economic networks that we call culture. We will read musicologists, cultural theorists, urban geographers, sociologists and educators who work to define urban space and the role of music and sound in urban environments, including through music education. While the readings make up our study of the sociology of urban space and the way we use music in everyday life to inform our conversations and the questions we ask, it is within the context of our personal experiences working with music programs at West Philadelphia High School or Henry C Lea Elementary, both inner city neighborhood schools serving economically disadvantaged students, that we will begin to formulate our theories of the contested musical micro-cultures of West Philadelphia. This course is over two-semesters where students register for .5cus each term (for a total of 1cu over the entire academic year) and is tied to the Music and Social Change Residential Program in Fisher Hassenfeld (http://fh.house.upenn.edu/musicandsocialchange). All participants volunteer in music classrooms for about 3 hours per week, are expected to go to at least two concerts in the community during the year, attend the seminar weekly and complete all assignments.
MUSC 018 402 | URBS 018 402
FGOLDBERG CH - FOERDERER BUILD205

Fulfills: Sector IV: Humanities & Social Sciences  |  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

Thinking About Popular Music
Glenda Goodman, Assistant Professor of Music 
This course traces the history of popular music in America from the nineteenth century to the present. We will start with parlor songs and social class and the racialized rise of minstrelsy in the antebellum period, track the separation of highbrow and lowbrow culture in the 19th century, explore the explosion of new styles in the early twentieth century, and witness the birth of hugely influential genres such as rock n roll in the 1950s and hip hop in the 1970s and 1980s. Throughout the semester we will consider how popular music intersects with and reflects individual and social identity, particularly in terms of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Students will engage intensively with popular songs and pieces while also gaining a firm grounding in the historical and social forces of which music was a part.
MUSC 044 301
TRVAN PELT LIBRARY452.2

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters

The Middle East Through Many Lenses
Heather Sharkey, Associate Professor of Modern Islamic History 
This freshman seminar introduces the contemporary Middle East by drawing upon cutting-edge studies written from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. These include history, political science, and anthropology, as well as studies of mass media, sexuality, religion, urban life, and the environment. We will spend the first few weeks of the semester surveying major trends in modern Middle Eastern history. We will spend subsequent weeks intensively discussing assigned readings along with documentary films that we will watch in class. The semester will leave students with both a foundation in Middle Eastern studies and a sense of current directions in the field.
NELC 036 401 | CIMS 036 401
TWILLIAMS HALL843

Fulfills: Sector IV: Humanities & Social Sciences  |  Cross Cultural Analysis

Ethics
Milton Meyer, Lecturer in Philosophy 
Three sorts of questions belong to the philosophical study of ethics: (a) Practical ethics discusses specific moral problems, often those we find most contested (e.g. abortion, euthanasia, killing noncombatants in war); (b) Ethical theory tries to develop systematic answers to moral judgments and rules (e.g. consequentialism, contractarianism); (c) Meta-ethics investigates questions about the nature of moral theories and their subject matter (e.g. are they subjective or objective, relative or non-relative?). We will rigorously investigate all three of these types of questions. A large part of the course will be focused on two highly contentious moral problems, abortion and killing noncombatants in war. The central aim of the required readings and discussion is a) to develop each question deeply and sharply enough for us to understand why it has been contentious; b) to see what new evidence could change the nature of the problem; and c) to suggest how to seek that further evidence. We will focus on how to read complex contemporary philosophical prose in order to outline and evaluate the arguments embedded within it. This will provide the basis for writing papers in which you defend a position with evidence and arguments. These skills are central to the practice of Philosophy. This course does not presuppose that students already have these skills. It is intended to teach them and presupposes a willingness on the part of students to do what is necessary to learn them. What this involves is detailed in a note on Penn in Touch called "Success in the Course". You should read this note before enrolling in the course to understand the commitment this course involves. Graded work: weekly paragraphs on a topic of your choice; three papers in multiple drafts; take-home final exam; class participation.
PHIL 002 301
TRVAN PELT LIBRARY302

Fulfills: Sector I: Society

Enhancing the Human Mind Through Technology
Gary Purpura, Assistant Dean for Academic Advising 
Transhumanists seek to extend the capacities of the human mind beyond the bounds of the human brain and body through technology. Indeed, for them, such an extension of human thinking and feeling represents the next big step in human cognitive evolution. In this course, we will examine the philosophical conception of a mind that underpins this movement to extend the human mind beyond human biology. Through an examination of the hypothesis that there can be non-biological thinking and feeling, we consider whether technologies that enable or enhance human mental faculties might one day completely supplant the biological machinery of the human body. We will also consider the moral issues surrounding the creation of transhumans. The questions that we consider in this course will get to the heart of what it means to possess a human mind and indeed to be a human being.
PHIL 032 301
MWWILLIAMS HALL741

Fulfills: Sector IV: Humanities & Social Sciences

Philosophy East and West
Kok-Chor Tan, Professor of Philosophy 
Our goal in this course is to bring Western Philosophy and Eastern Philosophy into dialogue. Topics we will cover include skepticism and knowledge, ethics and the good life, moral responsibility and personal relationships, and political obligation and justice. Do the Western and Eastern philosophical traditions approach these topics in the same way? Do they even share an understanding of what the problems and issues at stake are? And what can we learn from comparative philosophy? This freshman seminar does not presuppose prior knowledge of philosophy. Examples of authors we will study include Descartes, Aristotle, Mencius, and Confucius.
PHIL 221 301
MWVAN PELT LIBRARY402

Fulfills: Sector II: History & Tradition

Honors Physics I: Mechanics and Wave Motion
Charles Kane, Professor of Physics 
This course parallels and extends the content of PHYS 150, at a significantly higher mathematical level. Recommended for well-prepared students in engineering and the physical sciences, and particularly for those planning to major in physics. Classical laws of motion: interaction between particles; conservation laws and symmetry principles; rigid body motion; non-inertial reference frames; oscillations.

Students must enroll in both the seminar (PHYS 170.301, shown far below) and one of the labs ( PHYS 170.302, 303, 304 or 305, immediately below).

PHYS 170.302 (lab) | T | 0300PM - 0500PM
PHYS 170.303 (lab) | R | 0300PM - 0500PM
PHYS 170.304 (lab) | W | 0300PM - 0500PM
PHYS 170.305 (lab) | T | 0600PM - 0800PM

PHYS 170 301
MWFDAVID RITTENHOUSE LABA6MDAVID RITTENHOUSE LABA6

Fulfills: Sector VI: Physical World

The Contemporary American City
Daniel Hopkins, Associate Professor of Political Science 
This course explores the economic and social challenges facing large US cities since roughly 1965 as well as the cities' political and policy responses. Its major topics include the changing relations between racial and ethnic groups, the political impact of suburbanization, and the political effects of deindustrialization and economic transformation. The course readings are drawn from recent urban political history, economics, and sociology as well as political science. The course pays special attention to the changing distribution of political and economic power in US metropolitan areas, and considers regional coordination and other potential policy responses.
PSCI 010 301
MSTITELER HALLB30

Fulfills: Sector I: Society  |  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

The Rise of Authoritarianism
Yue Hou, Assistant Professor of Political Science 
Recent political developments in Turkey, Hungary, and even the United States have provoked debate about the rise of authoritarian leaders in western democracies. In this seminar, we will examine the politics of non-democracies to help us understand the new and growing global wave of authoritarianism. How do dictatorships work? When do democracies break down and when do autocracies collapse? How do non-competitive elections affect authoritarian rule? Do competitive elections strengthen civil liberties? Are democracies more or less susceptible to corruption, property expropriation, nationalism, or xenophobia? Do non-democracies produce higher economic growth? Throughout the course, we will also build empirical knowledge about the politics of particular authoritarian regimes.
PSCI 010 302
RVAN PELT LIBRARY526

Fulfills: Sector I: Society

The Politics of Reproduction
Dawn Teele, Assistant Professor of Political Science 
The idea that the "personal" is "political" finds no greater example than in the politics of reproduction. From inheritance laws, the rights of the offspring of enslaved peoples, or policies to reduce (or increase) fertility, the modern nation state has had a great deal to say about the use and produce of women's bodies. In this course we will examine how formal and informal institutions have governed reproductive practices over the past 200 years. We will look at how family structures and economic development map onto fertility, and at how technological innovations in fertility control (including birth control and IVF) have influenced women's economic and political participation. We will also examine the "dark side" of reproductive policies -- not only sterilization campaigns but also the treatment of sex workers and IVF -- to understand how state policies have divided women based on race, class, and occupation. Throughout the course we will analyze how formal and informal institutions can and have been subverted through collective action.
PSCI 010 303
TPERRY WORLD HOUSE108

Fulfills: Sector I: Society

Race, Crime & Punishment
Marie Gottschalk, Professor of Political Science 
Why are African Americans and some other groups disproportionately incarcerated and subjected to penal sanctions? What are the political, social, and economic consequences for individuals, communities, and the wider society of mass incarceration in the United States? What types of reforms of the criminal justice system are desirable and possible? This seminar analyzes the connection between race, crime, punishment, and politics in the United States. The primary focus is on the role of race in explaining why the country’s prison population increased six-fold since the early 1970s and why the United States today has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The class will likely take field trips to a maximum-security jail in Philadelphia and to a state prison in the Philadelphia suburbs.
PSCI 010 401 | AFRC 010 401
TVAN PELT LIBRARY402

Fulfills: Sector I: Society  |  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

Modern Catholic Christianity
E. Ann Matter, Professor of Religious Studies, Emeritus 
At the turn of the twentieth century, Sigmund Freud hypothesized that religion was a dead duck. Many other thinkers of "modernity" have agreed with his thesis; and yet, over a century later, it is clear that religion is still a forceful presence in human culture. One religious tradition that has survived to the surprise (and even consternation) of some critics, is Roman Catholic Christianity. This Freshman Seminar will look closely at the Catholic Church in the twenty-first century, to explore the ways in which Catholicism has (and has not) adapted to modernity. We will begin with an investigation into the history of Roman Catholicism; how it is defined, and how it developed in relation to politics and culture in the Roman Empire, medieval and early modern Europe, and in the Americas; but most of the semester will focus on the Catholic Church of the past 200 years, especially as it appears in the United States. We will consider the relationship of Catholicism to many aspects of modern life, including science and technology, political systems and leaders, aesthetics (visual arts, music, literature and film), and understandings of gender and sexuality. There will be a mid-term examination and a final paper of 6 to 10 pages.
RELS 033 301
MWCLAUDIA COHEN HALL392

Fulfills: Sector II: History & Tradition

Russian Short Story
Vladislav Todorov, Senior Lecturer 
This course studies the development of 19th and 20th century Russian literature through one of its most distinct and highly recognized genres, the short story. The readings include great masters of fiction such as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Solzhenitsyn, and others. The course presents the best works of short fiction and situates them in a literary process that contributes to the history of a larger cultural-political context. Students will learn about the historical formation, poetic virtue, and thematic characteristics of major narrative modes such as romanticism, utopia, realism, modernism, socialist realism, and post-modernism. We critique the strategic use of various devices of literary representation such as irony, absurd, satire, grotesque, anecdote, etc. Some of the main topics and issues include: culture of the duel; the role of chance; the riddle of death; anatomy of madness; imprisonment and survival; the pathologies of St. Petersburg; terror and homo sovieticus.
RUSS 196 301
MWWILLIAMS HALL24

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters  |  Cross Cultural Analysis

Planning to Be Offshore
Srilata Gangulee, Assistant Dean for Academic Advising 
In this course, I assume that a nation is an organic entity. Its development involves new strategies as the nation evolves and new voices arise both within the nation and outside. Necessarily then, periodically, the nation transforms itself. Here we will trace the socio-economic development of India from its independence in 1947 to the present. In 1947, India became a parliamentary democracy with a federal republican form of government. In 1951, the Indian economy started out as a centrally planned mixed economy with a private as well as a public sector but in 1991 decided to reduce its public sector and expand its private. Now India has not only the two sectors, a large private and a small public, but also a very large “informal sector." India has started encouraging foreign investors to come in. The Planning Commission of India existed till 1990 but changed into an indicative rather than a directive planning body. In 2014, the newly elected BJP changed its name to NITI (National Institute for Transforming India) Ayog (Commission in Hindi). India’s foreign policy also has evolved from non-alignment to cautiously tilting a bit more towards the US as well. We will also look at India’s relationship with other nations in Asia, notably China and India’s neighbors in South Asia. Students are expected to write four one-page response papers and one final paper. Twenty percent of the final grade will be based on class participation, 20 percent on the four response papers and 60 percent on the final paper.
SAST 057 301
TRPSYCHOLOGY LABC41

Fulfills: Sector I: Society

Poverty and Inequality
Regina Baker, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
What does it mean to live in poverty in the "land of plenty" and experience inequality in the "land of opportunity?" This Freshman Seminar explores these questions and others related to poverty and inequality in contemporary America. The first part of this course focuses on poverty. We will examine topics such as poverty perceptions and measurement, poverty trends, causes of poverty, poverty-related outcomes, and anti-poverty policy. The second part of this course focuses on inequality more broadly. We will examine how inequality is defined and what it looks like in the U.S. We will compare the “Haves" and the "Have Nots” and discuss social class, mobility, wealth, and privilege. Lastly, we will explore how different domains (e.g. education, the labor market, health, the justice system) produce, maintain, and reproduce inequalities. Throughout the semester, we will consider the roles of race/ethnicity, gender, age, and place, and how they help deepen our understanding of poverty and inequality.
SOCI 041 301
MWWILLIAMS HALL28

Fulfills: Sector I: Society

Social Inequality & Health
Courtney Boen, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
Eat well. Exercise regularly. Get 7-9 hours of sleep. We have all been bombarded with this type of advice for achieving and maintaining optimal health. But how are our health behaviors and outcomes shaped, influenced, and constrained by social factors? How does where we live influence how—and how long—we live? And how do racism, gender inequality, and other forms of social exclusion, oppression, and domination impact health and well-being? This course provides an introduction into how social forces, broadly, and social inequality, specifically, impact individual and population health. We will begin by learning about how health is more than the product of individual lifestyle choices and genetic factors by exploring the social determinants of health. We will then examine how social inequality—particularly along lines of race, immigration status, social class, and gender—contributes to population health differences. We will analyze how racism, gender inequality, and other forms of social stratification both shape access to health promoting resources and opportunities such as well-paying jobs and healthy and affordable foods and also pattern exposure to harmful stressors and toxins such as discrimination and violence. Finally, we will discuss and debate policy and programmatic approaches aimed at reducing population health disparities. In this course, we will examine concepts related to social inequality and health through a process called "active learning,” which involves activities such as watching and reacting to films, reading about and responding to current events, and active dialogues and debates with classmates.
SOCI 041 302
MWDAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB4E19

Fulfills: Sector I: Society

Diversity, Technology and the Penn Experience
Janice Curington, Assistant Dean for Multicultural Affairs and Advising 
Penn is diverse in many ways. Let us explore this diversity together and understand its subtleties. How has the word “diversity” evolved over the years? Why is it (at times) such a loaded concept? When, where and how does diversity change within various contexts? What does the concept mean in a university context? How might it change in the future? We will explore different constructions of diversity at Penn. Have new technologies changed the ways in which we perceive culture, communicate and share ideas? Increasingly, we construct notions of ourselves and of others using video and social media in addition to personal experiences. How do such technologies define who we are, and the boundaries we draw to define “us” and “them?" Do sub-cultures thrive now in new ways? How does each student’s journey to Penn bring in new perspectives on the university? Reflections on personal experiences in the context of theories (cultural capital, social capital) will be a core part of this seminar. Readings and research assignments are interdisciplinary and will require critical analysis of both classic and contemporary perspectives. In addition to other assignments, small weekly response papers are due before each class meeting to encourage engaged discussions.
SOCI 041 303
MWVAN PELT LIBRARY124

Fulfills: Sector I: Society  |  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

Environment & Society
Daniel Cohen, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
This freshman seminar will introduce students to a range of novel social perspectives on the contemporary global environmental crisis that is usually represented in strictly scientific terms or according to clichés about environmentalists, grouped into four themes. First, we will emphasize the fundamentally global nature of environmental problems like greenhouse gases and water scarcity. Second, we will explore the rich analogies between human and non-human consciousness, and how the relationship between humans and non-humans varies across time and space. Third, we will explore new thinking on environmental inequality, which explores the subtle ways in which all social groups both make and suffer the global environment in distinctive ways. Fourth, against the intuitive despair that global environmental crisis is too great for any of us to have any positive impact, we will explore the surprising ways in which motivated individuals, working together, can do more than ever to help alleviate our ecological crises.
SOCI 041 304
TRMEYERSON HALLB7

Fulfills: Sector I: Society

Everyday Technologies and the Making of the Modern World
Ian C. Petrie, Senior Associate Director, Center for Teaching and Learning 
Long before iPhones and Fitbits, personal technology -- small(ish), portable, purchasable -- had a tremendous impact on the lives of people around the globe. Items such as wristwatches, bicycles, sewing machines and radios could empower their users (or sometimes discipline them), creating economic, educational or recreational opportunities while also being associated with grander ideas and ideologies. This course will explore such everyday technologies across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, in locations spanning the Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia. We will consider how the use and significance of particular technologies varied according to time and place; how these everyday items could contribute to "self-fashioning" for individuals, nations, and empires; and how, through use and modification, consumers themselves could become part of the story of technological change. In addition to reading a variety of classic and recent scholarship, students will work with a wide array of primary sources (newspapers, photographs, patent records, trade cards) and use digital tools to present their own research projects.
STSC 078 301
MWCLAUDIA COHEN HALL204

Fulfills: Sector II: History & Tradition

Theatre in Philadelphia
Rosemary Malague, Senior Lecturer in Theatre Arts 
This course will investigate the state of the contemporary, non-profit theatre culture of Philadelphia by examining the history, artistic mission, and current production work of selected city theatre companies. This course will also explore the creative process of theatre-making as undertaken by these theatres through the reading of plays being produced by them this fall, through an analysis of the collaborative contribution of the playwright, director, actors, and designers to the creation of a production, and, finally, through attendance at those productions mounted by the theatre companies under investigation. The members of the class will write individual essays responding to these productions, do research and give group presentations on other Philadelphia theatre companies, and participate daily in a spirited dialogue about the vitality, level of artistic accomplishment, and cultural/social value of contemporary theatre in Philadelphia.
THAR 076 301
TRFISHER-BENNETT HALL322

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters

Introduction to Acting
Brooke O'Harra, Senior Lecturer in Theatre Arts 
Rooted in the system devised by Constantine Stanislavsky, but incorporating a wide variety of approaches, including improvisation, this courtesies students step by step through the practical work an actor must do to live and behave truthfully on-stage. Beginning with relaxation and physical exercise, interactive games, and ensemble building, students then learn and put into practice basic acting techniques, including sensory work, the principles of action, objectives, given circumstances, etc. The semester culminates in the performance of a scene or scenes, most often from a play from the Realist tradition. This course strongly stresses a commitment to actor work and responsibility to one's fellow actors. Practical work is supplemented by readings from Stanislavsky and a variety of other acting theorists that may include Uta Hagen, Robert Cohen, Stella Adler, among others. Students are required to submit short essays over the course of the semester in response to the readings and in preparation for their final scene project.
THAR 120 301
TRANNENBERG CENTER511

Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & Letters

Homelessness & Urban Inequality
Dennis Culhane, Professor of Social Policy 
This freshman seminar examines the homelessness problem from a variety of scientific and policy perspectives. Contemporary homelessness differs significantly from related conditions of destitute poverty during other eras of our nation's history. Advocates, researchers and policymakers have all played key roles in defining the current problem, measuring its prevalence, and designing interventions to reduce it. The first section of this course examines the definitional and measurement issues, and how they affect our understanding of the scale and composition of the problem. Explanations for homelessness have also been varied, and the second part of the course focuses on examining the merits of some of those explanations, and in particular, the role of the affordable housing crisis. The third section of the course focuses on the dynamics of homelessness, combining evidence from ethnographic studies of how people become homeless and experience homelessness, with quantitative research on the patterns of entry and exit from the condition. The final section of the course turns to the approaches taken by policymakers and advocates to address the problem, and considers the efficacy and quandaries associated with various policy strategies. The course concludes by contemplating the future of homelessness research and public policy.
URBS 010 401 | AFRC 041 401 | SOCI 041 401
FMCNEIL BUILDING167-8

Fulfills: Sector I: Society  |  Cultural Diversity in the U.S.

Vagelos Integrated Program in Energy Research Seminar II
Andrew Rappe, Professor of Chemistry; John Vohs, Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 
This is the second part of the two-semester seminar designed to introduce students to the VIPER program and help them prepare for energy-related research. In this semester we will continue to discuss research articles on various energy-related topics, best practices for library research, presentation of data, basic research methods, research ethics, data analysis, and funding options. A large focus of the course will also be on presenting (in both written and oral form) the work from the students' summer research internships. The course is restricted to VIPER-enrolled students only.
VIPR 121 301
TCHEMISTRY BUILDING514