Featured Courses for Spring 2018
< Courses & Registration

Featured courses are new courses and ones you may have missed that are recommended by major departments and programs. Below is the list of the featured courses offered in Spring 2018.
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INTRODUCTION TO AFRICANA STUDIES
MICHAEL HANCHARD    
The aim of this course is to provide an interdisciplinary examination of the complex array of African American and other African Diaspora social practices and experiences. This class will focus on both classic texts and modern works that provide an introduction to the dynamics of African American and African Diaspora thought and practice. Topics include: What is Africana Studies?; The History Before 1492; Creating the African Diaspora After 1500; The Challenge of Freedom; Race, Gender and Class in the 20th Century; From Black Studies to Africana Studies: The Future of Africana Studies.
AFRC 001 001 | MWANNENBERG SCHOOL111
Fulfills: Humanities & Social Science Sector
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement

CONFLCT GEOGRAPHIES IN AFRICA (& PHILA):SPACES OF WAR, MEMORY & RESISTANCE
DELIA WENDEL    
This course will primarily consider case studies in Africa with a view to drawing comparisons with conflict geographies here at home (in Philadelphia or where you consider home to be). Conflicts on the African continent are some of the least well understood by lay publics; often characterized as the result of pre-modern tribalism and a naturalized consequence of state dysfunction or resource scarcity. In this course, we will demystify the notion that war is inevitable or that some cultures are naturally prone to conflict. We will do so by examining some of the underlying challenges to consensus and peace in cities and countries in Africa, drawing connection to conditions, both historic and contemporary, that exist closer to home. After all-and as recent conflict conflict geographies such as the Dakota Access Pipeline, Charlottesville Rally, and Women's March remind us-spaces and communities in in the United States are rife with struggle and contestation. Throughout the semester, we will ask: How do individuals experience conflict? What roles do spaces have in structuring oppression, activating conflicts, resisting power, and building peace? How is the study of conflict-understood as both routine contestation and violent confrontation-informed by research on built and natural environments? This is a course that will require the active participation of every individual-in completing all readings, preparing questions and comments, and debating issues with respect and openness. There are no other prerequisites for this course, nor preferred disciplinary concentrations. We will draw from our collective experiences (academic and and personal) to discuss research in diverse fields, including Anthropology, Conflict and Peace Studies, Geography, Political Ecology, and Urban Studies.
AFRC 328 401 | MVAN PELT LIBRARY305
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

COLONIAL OBJECTS, COMMODITIES, BODIES: ARCH OF LATIN AMERICA SINCE 1492
DOUGLAS SMIT    
In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue, unleashing five centuries of conquest and colonialism that continues to influence contemporary Latin America. This course examines the archaeology of the colonial encounter between Spanish/Portuguese and indigenous peoples of the Americas. Students will learn how to incorporate material evidence with archival approaches to colonial history, using archaeology to understand the roles of social groups often overlooked by colonial archives (e.g. indigenous peoples, women, Afro-Latin Americans). In short, this course will be a material history of colonialism from below, focusing on the conflicts and negotiations over material culture, economic systems, religion, and biology. No prior knowledge of archaeology or Latin American history is required. The course readings will balance secondary historical readings with archaeology articles on similar topics, in order to highlight the benefits of a material culture approach to the colonial encounter in Latin America. However, the course will mainly focus on the experiences, responses, and negotiation of conquest and colonization by indigenous societies in Latin American. Regional coverage will include Spanish colonialism in the Caribbean (Taino), Mexico (Aztec), Central America (Mayan), Andean South America (Inka), as well as Portuguese incursions in Brazil. Students will be evaluated on short written responses to readings, a midterm and non-cumulative final exam, and a research paper.
ANTH 277 401 | TRCHEMISTRY BUILDING109
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY
GRETCHEN SUESS    
This undergraduate seminar is about how ethnographers do research. It introduces fundamental concepts and techniques - research design, participant observation, interviews, questionnaires, field notes, archives, data collection and analysis. It also addresses ethical and legal issues- cultural protocols, intellectual property rights, collaborative anthropology, and institutional review boards. Students will conduct original ethnographic research in partnership with the Netter Center.
ANTH 303 301 | MCHEMISTRY BUILDING514
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Academically Based Community Service Course

HISTORICAL ECOLOGY
CLARK ERICKSON    
The relationship between the human beings and the environment is complex, dynamic, and contentious. Historical ecology addresses this relationship over the long term through the physical signatures and patterns of past human activity that are embedded in landscape. In some preindustrial cases, humans caused environmental degradation and societal collapse. In other situations, people transformed, created, and managed resources for sustainable lifeways over centuries and increased biodiversity. This seminar will examine the Myth of the Ecologically Noble Savage, the Myth of the Pristine Environment, domestication of landscape, biocultural diversity, the alliance between native peoples and Green Politics, and the contribution of past societies to appropriate technology, sustainable development, and biodiversity through the historical, ethnographic, and archaeological record.
ANTH 331 301 | TRUNIVERSITY MUSEUM330
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

DISPOSABILITY: ANTHROPOLOGY IN A WORLD OF WASTE
JACOB DOHERTY    
Waste is all around us. A product of everyday life, of economic activity, of regimes of bodily care and hygiene, waste is an inescapable aspect of modern life and a central element in the constitution of cultural difference. What does the world look like from the vantage point of its diverse waste streams? Taking up classic and contemporary anthropological approaches to waste, the course asks where is "away" when we throw things away? How does the production, disposal, and management of waste contribute to the construction of social differences of race, class, and gender? We examine disposability as a simultaneously material and social phenomena, considering the cultural history, environmental impacts, and economic afterlives of disposable consumer goods and analyzing the historical processes, social institutions, and cultural formations that render certain lives, bodies, populations and environments disposable.
ANTH 364 301 | WUNIVERSITY MUSEUM329
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

GOTHIC ARCH: GOLD+STONE
SARAH GUERIN    
Key monuments of the Middle Ages, the Gothic cathedrals of Western Europe present a synthesis of the theological, economic, and social developments of the twelfth through fourteenth centuries. A harmonious marriage between technology and aesthetics, of political power and imagination, these immense and ingenious structures are as famous for their sculptural programs as they are for the liturgies that animated their spaces. Students will also be introduced to local uses of Gothic in Philadelphia architecture to better understand the lived experiences of these built manifestations of transcendence.
ARTH 245 401 | TRJAFFE BUILDING104
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

ART NOW
KAJA SILVERMAN    
One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasinglyimportant exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.
ARTH 294 401 | MWSTITELER HALLB26
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

ASIAN AMERICAN FOOD
FARIHA KHAN    
You are what you eat. Asian American Food explores the history, politics, and ethnic identity of food through a cultural lens. Growing food, eating, and sharing meals serve as intimate expressions of self and community. By examining the production and consumption of food, the course investigates the ways that Asian Americans navigate traditions, gender norms, religious dietary laws, food habits, and employment as they create lives in the United States. The course overviews the history of Asian American foodways, but has a particular focus on Philadelphia's Asian American communities.
ASAM 180 401 | TRMEYERSON HALLB6
Fulfills: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

TOPICS IN ASIAN AMER LIT: RACE & ASIAN AMERICA LIT
JOSEPHINE PARK    
Topics vary. Please see our website for more current information: asam.sas.upenn.edu
ASAM 202 401 | TRFISHER-BENNETT HALL224
Fulfills: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

CHEM OF THE ENVIRONMENT
MARSHA LESTER     ERIC SCHELTER    
The course aims to teach chemical content and principles in the context of significant environmental issues. Topics to be covered include: composition of the atmosphere; protecting the ozone layer; chemistry of global warming; traditional hydrocarbon fuels and energy utilization; water supply, its contaminants, and waste water treatment; acid rain; nuclear energy; and new energy sources. Students will develop critical thinking ability, competence to better assess risks and benefits, and skills that will lead them to be able to make informed decisions about technology-based matters.
CHEM 012 001 | TRCHEMISTRY BUILDINGB13
Fulfills: Physical World SectorQuantitative Data Analysis
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement

APPROACHES LITERARY STD: AFRO-ENCOUNTERS: DIASPORA AND THE BLACK IMAGINATION
AUGUSTA IRELE    
COML 002.402 AFRO-ENCOUNTERS: DIASPORA AND BLACK IMAGINATION COMMUNICATION WITHIN THE CURRICULUM MW 3:30-5:00 IRELE CROSS LISTED: AFRC 003 What does it mean to be African? What, in particular, does it mean to be “of Africa”, for people who may have never been to the continent? How does diasporic African identity relate to the identity of Africans living in the continent? In this course we will explore how Black American and Caribbean writers and filmmakers from both sides of the diaspora have used travel and immigrant narratives to call attention to affinities and differences in identification and experience. We will grapple with a series of questions about African diasporic identity. How do African authors regard members of the Diaspora through their work? How has identification with the Diaspora transformed through literature and film over time? This course engages with music, film, and literature to explore the role that Africa has played in the diasporic imaginary. Students will interact with work from Langston Hughes, Aimé Césaire, Lorraine Hansberry, Jamaica Kincaid, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie along with films and contemporary music. Grading will be based primarily on oral presentations. The course is open to all students including those with no previous experience of literature.
COML 002 402 | MWFISHER-BENNETT HALL25
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Communication Within the Curriculum

WORLD LITERATURE
CORY KNUDSON     KAUSHIK RAMU    
How do we think of the world as such? Globalizing economic paradigms encourage one model that, while it connects distant regions with the ease of a finger-tap, also homogenizes the world, manufacturing patterns of sameness behind simulations of diversity. Our current world-political situation encourages another model, in which fundamental differences are held to warrant the consolidation of borders between Us and Them, "our world" and "theirs." This course begins with the proposal that there are other ways to encounter the world, that are politically compelling, ethically important, and personally enriching--and that the study of literature can help tease out these new paths. Through the idea of World Literature, this course introduces students to the appreciation and critical analysis of literary texts, with the aim of navigating calls for universality or particularity (and perhaps both) in fiction and film. "World literature" here refers not merely to the usual definition of "books written in places other than the US and Europe, "but any form of cultural production that explores and pushes at the limits of a particular world, that steps between and beyond worlds, or that heralds the coming of new worlds still within us, waiting to be born. And though, as we read and discuss our texts, we will glide about in space and time from the inner landscape of a private mind to the reaches of the farthest galaxies, knowledge of languages other than English will not be required, and neither will any prior familiary with the literary humanities. In the company of drunken kings, botanical witches, ambisexual alien lifeforms, and storytellers who've lost their voice, we will reflect on, and collectively navigate, our encounters with the faraway and the familiar--and thus train to think through the challenges of concepts such as translation, narrative, and ideology. Texts include Kazuo Ishiguro, Ursula K. LeGuin, Salman Rushdie, Werner Herzog, Jamaica Kincaid, Russell Hoban, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Arundhathi Roy, and Abbas Kiarostami.
COML 191 401 | MWFISHER-BENNETT HALL138
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

PEACE COMMUNICATION
EMILE BRUNEAU    
When 'me' and 'you' becomes 'us' and 'them', a suite of psychological processes are amplified or come online. In this course, we will examine the forces that drive people to engage in intergroup conflict through the lenses of evolutionary biology and psychology, and then examine the effectiveness of communications-based interventions at easing conflict. In the first part of the course, we will learn about the theoretical work on intergroup psychology; in the second part, we will examine the specific processes that drive conflict (e.g., stereotypes, prejudice, dehumanization) and how they are measured using both explicit self-report and implicit measures e.g., physiology, neuroimaging); in the third part, we will explore the interventions that have been demonstrated to work (and fail) to decrease intergroup conflict. No prior experience in psychology or neuroscience is required.
COMM 311 001 | MWFANNENBERG SCHOOL108
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

INTERNET VS DEMOCRACY
YPHTACH LELKES    
At the turn of the 21st century, many claimed that the internet would make the world a more democratic place. Have these prophecies born out? We examine the effects the internet has had on democracy, looking at research that examines whether, for instance, the internet has increased or decreased inequality, polarization, and political participation. In addition to reading and discussing empirical literature, we will also test many of the theories in this course through hands-on workshops in data science.
COMM 441 301 | WANNENBERG SCHOOL225
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Eastern Europe
KRISTEN GHODSEE    
The region of Central and Eastern Europe is a fascinating place to examine questions of gender and sexuality in a non-US context. Stretching from Montenegro on the Adriatic Sea to Estonia on the Baltic, these diverse countries are now mostly members of the European Union and NATO and share common 20th century experiments with various forms of state socialism. Through a combination of scholarly articles and literary fiction, this course will examine the changing status of women during and after the fall of communism, shifting constructions of masculinity, and the emergence of LGBT movements and communities in the post-socialist space. Specific topics will include: the woman question before 1989; gender and emerging nationalisms; neoliberal precarity, visual representations in television and film; social movements and radical politics; work; spirituality; and philosophical investigations into the culturally constructed concepts of "freedom" and "human rights" in post-authoritarian states. All readings and assignments are in English.
EEUR 157 401 | T
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

STUDY OF AN AUTHOR: SHAKESPEARE
ZACHARY LESSER    
This course introduces students to literary study through the works of a single author--often Shakespeare, but other versions will feature writers like Jane Austen, Geoffrey Chaucer, Herman Melville, and August Wilson. Readings an individual author across his or her entire career offers students the rare opportunity to examine works from several critical perspectives in a single course. What is the author's relation to his or her time? How do our author's works help us to understand literary history more generally? And how might be understand our author's legacy through performance, tributes, adaptations, or sequels? Exposing students to a range of approaches and assignments, this course is an ideal introduction to literary study for those students wishing to take an English course but not necessarily intending to major. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
ENGL 101 001 | MWFISHER-BENNETT HALL401
Fulfills: Arts & Letters Sector
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement

DIGITAL LIVES OF BOOKS
WHITNEY TRETTIEN    
What happens when literature goes digital? In this course, we'll explore how texts move through electronic media, tracking them across Facebook and Snapchat, into spam folders and onto our memory drives. Authors are forging new born-digital genres of writing, and we'll experience many of them. We'll read AI-generated poetry, watch a netprov performance, and play text adventure games. As we encounter these new forms of writing, we will consider bigger questions about the history, politics, and agency of books as they "go digital." For instance, how do algorithms amplify racial, gender, or linguistic biases online? And how did servers in the Ukraine become a major site of e-book piracy? Grounding these wide-ranging investigations will be a material history of electronic text technologies, from the development of the ASCII encoding standard and HTML to PDFs and epubs, learned by working hands-on with these formats. Students will leave the course with a concrete grasp of how texts operate in digital spaces, as well a set of critical concepts for understanding the future of reading and writing today.
ENGL 208 301 | MWVAN PELT LIBRARY623
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Objects Based Course

INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
ALAIN PLANTE    
This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems.
ENVS 100 001 | TRMEYERSON HALLB1
Fulfills: Physical World SectorQuantitative Data Analysis
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement

How Earth Works
ALAIN PLANTE    
In addition to the lecture and recitation portions of ENVS100, this freshman seminar will explore various issues in environmental science through social media literacy projects and in-depth discussions.
ENVS 100 301 | MVAN PELT LIBRARY113
Fulfills: Physical World SectorQuantitative Data AnalysisSector VI: Physical World
Tags: Freshmen Seminars | Fulfills a College Requirement

ADVAN FRENCH TRANSLATION
CHANTAL PHILIPPON-DANIEL    
This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of translation and is designed to help foster a critical understanding of differences between French and English syntactical and lexical patterns. It will introduce students to theoretical concepts and problems of translation, with the ultimate goal being to improve their ability to communicate in more authentic-sounding French. Students will have the opportunity to practice translation individually and to work with their peers on a variety of projects (advertising, journalistic and literary texts, movie and broadcast news subtitling) and to engage in critique and discussion of others' translations. This course will help students refine their language skills and navigate more proficiently between these cultures and language systems. (Designed for students who already have a solid foundation in French and English grammar)
FREN 325 301 | MWWILLIAMS HALL218
Fulfills: Advanced Language Course
Tags: Various Audiences

EARTH THROUGH TIME
ILEANA PEREZ-RODRIGUEZ    
An overview of the origin of Earth, continents, and life - examining the physical, chemical and biological evolution of the Earth through continental movements, changing climates, and evolving life.
GEOL 125 001 | TRSTITELER HALLB6
Fulfills: Physical World SectorQuantitative Data Analysis
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement

MAKING OF A MODERN WORLD
LEE CASSANELLI    
How did the world we now live in come to be? Is globalization a recent development or does it have a history of its own? At what point can we say that a world economy emerged and what sort of relations of production and distribution linked it together? When did people start thinking and acting as citizens of nations rather than as subjects of rulers or members of religious or ethnic communities, and what were the consequences? How should we conceptualize the great revolutions (French, American, Russian, Chinese) that would determine the landscapes of modern global politics? This course is designed to help us think about the "making of the modern," not by means of an exhaustive survey but by exploring a range of topics from unusual perspectives: piracy, patriotism, prophecy; global struggles for political and human rights,drivers of war and peace, capitalism, nationalism, socialism, fascism, fundamentalism; communication and culture.
HIST 001 001 | MWCOLLEGE HALL200
Fulfills: History & Tradition Sector
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

DISCOVER THE MIDDLE AGES
ADA KUSKOWSKI    
This course offers a broad introduction to the history of medieval Europe roughly from the fourth century CE, when Roman civilization faced a series of crises that led to its eventual fall in the West and ushered in the Middle Ages, to the sixteenth century, when European society entered a new early-modern phase. As this is a long period, we will focus on themes that will help us explore some of the most important historical problems related to the period: why was it that a sophisticated and militarily superior Roman empire could fall to "barbarians"? How did political power transform into a feudal model? What did it mean to be a medeival knight? The Middle Ages are known as "an age of faith" but, at the same time, it was an age of questioning that invented the modern university--what roles did faith and knowledge play in the medieval world? It was also a time where many cultures, races and religions came into contact, both at home and in efforts at exploration and conquest. How did medieval culture handle difference, and how did that influence early-modern and even modern approaches? The class will involve a mixture of lecture and discussion, and will include visits to local museum and manuscript collections to provide students first-hand contact with the visual and material culture of medieval Europe.
HIST 145 001 | MWCHEMISTRY BUILDING109
Fulfills: Cross Cultural Analysis
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION
JAMES VOELKEL    
During the 16th and 17th centuries, something that resembled modern science emerged from something that did not. Though the nature and cause of that transition are contested, there were unquestionably many pivotal developments in the content and conduct of science, and it is in this period that many of the 'founding' figures of science, from Copernicus to Galileo to Newton, are identified. This course will examine the many elements that went into the transition, including the revolution in cosmology, the revolt against ancient natural philosophy, the rise of experimentalism, the new philosophies of inquiry, new social structures for natural inquiry and the conceptual foundations of classical physics.
HSOC 202 401 | RWILLIAMS HALL741
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

THE MANY LIVES OF DATA
JAMES BERGMAN    
This is a class about the live(s) and afterlives of information from 1850 to the present. Not only can information be reproduced (in a variety of material conditions); it can be repurposed and funneled through a variety of different applications, some of them serving radically different purposes than the first purpose of gathering it. Thoreau's journals of plant flowering, for instance, have become important indicators of climate change. More controversial is the sale of biomedical information by personal genomics services for drug discovery, or the construction of forensic databases consisting of the DNA of suspects arrested as a result of racial profiling. We will study the ways in which data has become a way for us to understand and define change, stability, place, and time, beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, a period of accelerated and increasingly systematic gathering of data,particularly medical, forensic, and environmental data. The class will proceed both chronologically and thematically in three units, from the gathering and use of biomedical data as a way to make patient populations "legible" (to borrow from James Scott), to data as a way to make the environment understandable, and finally to data as a tool for producing and reproducing social relations. As a final project, students will trace a particular data set from its original gathering to its latest usage. Students will also have an opportunity to create their own course content in the final three weeks of class.
HSOC 370 401 | TRWILLIAMS HALL28
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

Adaptations: From Paper to Screen
ALESSANDRA MIRRA    
How many of your favorite films are actually literary adaptations? Literature and Film are two different worlds, with their own language and very specific features. These two worlds, though, often intertwine, and numerous films are inspired by literary works or popular narrative fiction – films that do not simply adapt the text to the visual medium, but give birth to a different work of art. What happens in this passage from the text to the screen? What gets lost, what is added, and how are things translated between two very different art forms? What are the theoretical implications of such a “translation”? The course will explore cinematic adaptations of famous literary works made by renowned Italian filmmakers. Case studies include, but are not limited to, Dante’s Comedy (Bertolini, 1911 and Cote-Lapoint, 2014); Boccaccio’s Decameron (Pasolini, 1971 and Taviani 2015); Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar (Taviani, 2012); The Gospel according to St. Mattew (Pasolini, 1964); Boito’s Senso(Visconti, 1954); Moravia, The Comformist (Bertolucci, 1970); Tomasi de Lampedusa’s The Leopard (Visconti, 1963). The course will provide students with the necessary critical tools to analyze both verbal and visual texts within the historical and cultural context of their production, as well as an overview of theoretical approaches in adaptation studies. Please note that the course is a freshman seminar, however, sophomores, juniors, and seniors may contact the Undergraduate Chair in Italian to discuss registration in this course. Freshman seminars may count toward the Italian Studies major/minor.
ITAL 100 401 | MWFFISHER-BENNETT HALL141
Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & LettersFreshman Seminar
Tags: Freshmen Seminars

DANTE'S DIVINE COMEDY
KEVIN BROWNLEE    
In this course we will read the Inferno, the Purgatorio and the Paradiso, focusing on a series of interrelated problems raised by the poem: authority, fiction, history, politics and language. Particular attention will be given to how the Commedia presents itself as Dante's autobiography, and to how the autobiographical narrative serves as a unifying thread for this supremely rich literary text. Supplementary readings will include Virgil's Aeneid and selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses. All readings and written work will be in English. Italian or Italian Studies credit will require reading Italian texts in their original language and writing about their themes in Italian. This course may be taken for graduate credit, but additional work and meetings with the instructor will be required. Course fulfills Cross Cultural Analysis. Note that this course is open to various audiences. If you would like this course to count toward the Italian Studies major/minor please contact the Undergraduate Chair in Italian for further details.
ITAL 333 401 | TRWILLIAMS HALL215
Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & LettersCross Cultural AnalysisBenjamin Franklin Seminar
Tags: Benjamin Franklin Seminar | Fulfills a College Requirement

Hearing (in) the Middle Ages
MARY CALDWELL    
The primary goal of the freshman seminar program is to provide every freshman the opportunity for a direct personal encounter with a faculty member in a small setting devoted to a significant intellectual endeavor. Specific topics will be posted at the beginning of each academic year. Please see the College Freshman seminar website for information on current course offerings http:/www .college.upenn.edu/courses/seminars/freshman.php. Fulfills Arts and Letters sector requirement.
MUSC 016 301 | WFISHER-BENNETT HALL406
Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & LettersFreshman Seminar
Tags: Freshmen Seminars | Fulfills a College Requirement

VOICING POLITICS/POLITICIZING VOICES
MARIA MURPHY    
What does it mean to have a voice? To raise your voice? To have your voice heard? What do our voices say about us and what do they fail to communicate? How we speak and how our voices are perceived impact our interactions in daily life, our participation in the political sphere, and our capacity to effect change through activism. This CWiC course explores the parameters by which voice is defined in the context of music and sound studies, social justice, philosophy, and media and communication studies. We will consider how voice embodies our political constitution through an examination of the vocal practices of artists such as Tanya Tagaq, Anohni, Juliana Huxtable, Laurie Anderson, Sikh Knowledge, and Lucas Silveira; the phenomena of voice-activated devices such as Apple s Siri and Amazon s Echo; and the collective voices of movements such as Black Lives Matter and the Standing Rock water protectors. Through individual and group presentations, discussions, and creative projects, this critical speaking seminar encourages students to develop their oral communication skills while examining what informs their individual and collective voices. No previous musical training required. Enrollment limited to 16.
MUSC 048 401 | TRFISHER-BENNETT HALL406
Fulfills: Cultural Diversity in the U.S.
Tags: Communication Within the Curriculum | Critical Speaker Seminars | Fulfills a College Requirement

CAPSTONE: PHILOSOPHY: THE EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN AND GIRLS
THOMAS NOAH    
A PPE Capstone seminar offered by faculty in Philosophy.
PPE 484 301 | RCLAUDIA COHEN HALL204
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Principally for Major

ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
AYELET RUSCIO    
The concepts of normality, abnormality, and psychopathology; symptom syndromes;theory and research in psychopathology and psychotherapy.
PSYC 162 001 | MFLEIDY LAB10
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

SOCIAL EMOTIONAL DEVELOP
SARA JAFFEE    
This course will cover theory and research related to the development of attachment, emotional regulation, peer and intimate relationships, personality, moral reasoning, and emotional and behavioral disorders. The course will emphasize the degree to which family, peer, and community contexts influence development from infancy into adulthood. Efforts will be made to integrate biological and environmental accounts of development across the lifespan.
PSYC 280 001 | TRFISHER-BENNETT HALL419
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE: FROM THE TOWER OF BABEL TO ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
JULIA VERKHOLANTSEV    
This is a course in European intellectual history. It explores the historical trajectory, from antiquity to the present day, of the idea that there once was, and again could be, a universal and perfect language among the human race. If recovered, it can explain the origins and meaning of human experience, and can enable universal understanding and world peace. The tantalizing question of the possibility of a universal language have been vital and thought-provoking throughout the history of humanity. The idea that the language spoken by Adam and Eve was a language which perfectly expressed the nature of all earthly objects and concepts has occupied the minds of intellectuals for almost two millennia. In defiance of the Christian biblical myth of the confusion of languages and nations at the Tower of Babel, they have over and over tried to overcome divine punishment and discover the path back to harmonious existence. By recovering or recreating a universal language, theologians hoped to be able to experience the divine; philosophers believed that it would enable apprehension of the laws of nature, while mystic cabbalists saw in it direct access to hidden knowledge. In reconstructing a proto-language, 19th-century Indo-Europeanist philologists saw the means to study the early stages of human development. Even in the 20th century, romantic idealists, such as the inventor of Esperanto Ludwik Zamenhof, strived to construct languages to enable understanding among estranged nations. For writers and poets of all times, from Cyrano de Bergerac to Velimir Khlebnikov, the idea of a universal and perfect language has been an inexhaustible source of inspiration. Today, this idea echoes in theories of universal and generative grammars, in approaching English as a global tongue, and in various attempts to create artificial languages, even a language for cosmic communication. Each week we address a particular period and set of theories to learn about universal language projects, but above all, the course examines fundamental questions of what language is and how it functions in human society.
RUSS 095 401 | MWWILLIAMS HALL3
Fulfills: Cross Cultural Analysis
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

SCI & RELIG GLOBAL PERSP
BEKIR KUCUK    
This survey course provides a thematic overview of science and religion from antiquity to the present. We will treat well-known historical episodes, such as the emergence of Muslim theology, the Galileo Affair and Darwinism, but also look beyond them. This course is designed to cover all major faith traditions across the globe as well as non-traditional belief systems such as the New Age movement and modern Atheism
STSC 208 001 | MWMCNEIL BUILDING103
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

WATERS, ROADS AND WIRES
ANN GREENE    
This course studies infrastructures: how and why they develop, how they are maintained, how they reshape environments, and how they interconnect with other infrastructures. We begin by reading about infrastructure and about large technological systems, then explore some specific American structures. Possible topics: the electrical grid, the interstate highway system, hydroelectric dams, Amtrak, urban mass transit systems, disasters and infrastructure (Katrina, Harvey, etc.). As the semester progresses, students will spend more time in class on individual research topics of their choice, and in working groups producing a group project.
STSC 362 301 | TRCLAUDIA COHEN HALL337
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

INTRO LIGHT,SET,COSTUME
ERIC BARATTA    
Design for theatre (and all of the performing arts) is a dynamic, collaborative process that engages both intellect and emotion in staging the dramatic moment. The personal vision of the designer must navigate the often-uncharted waters of the production process, from the earliest, personal moments of design inspiration to the opening night performance. Design flows from creativity, is structured by research and theory, and is realized in living form by collaboration in the dynamic process of theatre-making. This class will integrate history, theory and practice of stage design in the interactive setting of the Collaborative Classroom in Van Pelt Library in this special interdisciplinary, active-learning course offering open to all Penn students. Group and individual projects, field visits, practical projects and guest speakers will be featured in this newly-revised course.
THAR 130 301 | FVAN PELT LIBRARY113
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

AM THEATRE & PERFORMANCE: FAMILY DRAMA
ROSEMARY MALAGUE    
This course examines the development of the modern American theatre from the turn of the century to the present day. Progressing decade by decade the course investigates the work of playwrights such as Eugene O'Neil, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee, David Mamet, August Wilson and Tony Kushner, theatre companies such as the Provincetown Players and the Group Theatre, directors, actors, and designers. Some focus will also be given to major theatrical movements such as the Federal Theatre Project, Off-Broadway, regional theatre, experimental theatre of the Sixties, and feminist theatre.
THAR 272 401 | TRFISHER-BENNETT HALL323
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

PHILANTHROPY & THE CITY
DOUGLAS BAUER     GREG GOLDMAN    
This course will focus on how urban communities are shaped by the nonprofit sector and the billions of philanthropic dollars that fuel their work. By bridging theory and practice, the class explores what dynamics are at play to deliver vital services or programs in healthcare, education, the arts, community development, and other issues. The course will also focus on these important questions: (1) Whose responsibility is the public good? How is that responsibility shared by the public, private, and nonprofit sectors? and (2) Given that responsibility for the public good, which individuals and groups make the decisions about how to serve the public good? How are these decisions made, and who benefits from these decisions? Students will consider these questions in an interdisciplinary context that will bring a historical and philosophical perspective to the examination of the values and institutions that characterize the contemporary philanthropy and the nonprofit sector.
URBS 404 401 | RMCNEIL BUILDING169
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

Urban Ethnography: Capturing the Cultures of Cities
JOAN SAVERINO    
Cities can be exciting, dense, noisy, and dirty. They are places where the unexpected is expected to occur. One thing is certain however - urban settings are always full of the diversity of human expressivity. Through readings, videos, guest lectures, and field trips, this course explores the symbolic meanings and social production of urban life and culture in Philadelphia, the nation's sixth largest city. The urban landscape provides an intensification of cultural processes. How humans experience them are more easily studied and understood in an urban setting, giving this class the opportunity to explore social relational and cultural themes such as the ethnic city, the contested city, the global city, and the creative city. This course is structured as a seminar with readings from Philadelphia and other urban settings that introduce students to the study of the city as a site of everyday practice. In addition, the course offers step-by-step training in conducting an ethnographic fieldwork project on an urban topic of the student's interest.
URBS 427 601 | WMCNEIL BUILDING110
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

THEORIES OF COLOR: IDEAS AND CONTEXT
TAWRIN BAKER    
In this course we will investigate ideas about color, along with color practices, from antiquity to the nineteenth century. Our survey will follow three intertwined threads. We will examine physical color theories: what various thinkers believed color was insofar as it exists in the things we see, together with how color was related to light. We will study the anatomy and physiology of the eye, especially the way in which ideas about the body, the eye, and the mind shaped, and were shaped by, ideas about color. And we will trace how people in the past have struggled to bring color under control, including the history of alchemy, early chemistry, dyeing, and printing.
VLST 215 401 | MWJAFFE BUILDING113
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences