Featured Courses for Fall 2017
< Courses & Registration

Featured courses are new courses and ones you may have missed that are recommended by major departments and programs. Below is the list of the featured courses offered in Fall 2017.
You may filter by a course tag:
ARCHAEOLOGY: WINDOW TO THE HUMAN PAST
MEGAN KASSABAUM    
This course will introduce students to the methods and theory of archaeology by exploring how we turn archaeological data into statements about cultural behavior. We will discuss the place of archaeology in the broader field of anthropology and debate issues facing the discipline today. The course will rely on case studies from around the world and from many different time periods to introduce students to the research process, field and lab methods, and essential questions of archaeological anthropology. Students will have the opportunity to work hands-on with archaeological materials through visiting the galleries and working with Penn Museum collections.
ANTH 001 001 | MWUNIVERSITY MUSEUMB17
Fulfills: History & Tradition Sector
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
DEBORAH THOMAS    
An introduction to the anthropological study of human social and cultural diversity throughout the world, with special emphasis on the development of the idea of culture as an analytical concept. The course includes sections on the ethnographic research method and on the library of ethnographic material relating to cultural change in different parts of the world that anthropology has produced since the 19th century.
ANTH 002 001 | MWUNIVERSITY MUSEUMB17
Fulfills: Society SectorCross Cultural Analysis
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

Globalization and its Historical Significance
MAURO GUILLEN    
This course describes and analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural.
ANTH 012 401 | MDAVID RITTENHOUSE LABA1
Fulfills: Humanities & Social Science SectorCross Cultural Analysis
Tags: Academically Based Community Service Course | Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

THE ECOLOGY OF ART
AARON LEVY    
Topic varies. Spring 2018: Starting with the Penn Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the seminar will visit major collections of Philadelphia, both to examine the works of art and artifacts (on display and in storage) and to meet with directors, curators, keepers, and collectors. Most meetings will take place in the museums, not in the classroom. While the seminar will provide an overview of the history of art, our discussions on site will focus on changing aesthetics and collecting practices, aspects of display and contextualization, the institution of the museum, thing theory, and the blurred boundaries between ethnography, archaeology, and art history.
ARTH 100 401 | TMEYERSON HALLB4
Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & LettersFreshman Seminar
Tags: Freshmen Seminars | Objects Based Course

LATIN AMERICAN ART
DAVID KIM     GWENDOLYN SHAW    
Fall 2017: The numerous traditions of Latin American art have been formed from the historical confluence of Indigenous, European, African, and Asian cultural traditions, each one impacting the others. This course serves as an introduction to these hybrid New World art forms and movements by both providing a large chronological sweep (1492-present) and focusing on several specific countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Peru, and Argentina.
ARTH 267 401 | WFVAN PELT LIBRARY627
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

Asian American Cinema Movement: Fighting For Representation
ROBERT BUSCHER    
Providing a broad introduction to the history of persons of Asian descent living in the United States, this course will specifically examine the Asian American & Pacific Islander American experience as told through the cinematic lens. Equal parts socio-political history and media studies, this course will comprehensively assess factors contributing to the historical under representation of AAPIs in mainstream American media. By contrast, the media texts that we study will reveal a cinematic history that runs parallel to the mainstream, consisting of independently produced films created by and/or starring AAPIs that feature authentic portrayals of the community they represent. Topics will include economics of film production, broadcast television ratings, film festivals as a mechanism of distribution, negative stereotyping, Hollywood whitewashing, cultural appropriation, and media activism.
ASAM 200 601 | WWILLIAMS HALL315
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

ENERGY TRANSFORMATIONS AND LIVING OFF-THE-GRID
LAWRENCE ROME    
The course will examine major sources of energy on earth: sunlight, mechanical, chemical and biological, and how this energy is transformed into useful energy for humans - typically electrical energy or food. Considerable emphasis will be on forms of regenerative energy that can be used when living off-the-grid. As a case study, we will examine some approaches taken by the US military to provide energy capability for dismounted Marines operating on foot in austere environments. Faculty lectures will be supplemented by guest lectures from leaders in government and industry. No scientific knowledge is assumed beyond high school biology, chemistry and physics. Energy is necessarily a quantitative subject so students should be comfortable with quantitative approaches. A major goal of this course is for students to develop an awareness for the amounts of energy they use in their daily lives, and how they might reduce them. As an exercise, students will measure how much energy their smart phones and laptops use in a day and try to generate a comparable amount of energy through physical effort.
BIOL 138 301 | TRMCNEIL BUILDING169
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I
FENG GAI     ANDREW RAPPE    
Basic concepts and principles of chemistry and their applications in chemistry and closely-related fields. The first term emphasizes the understanding of chemical reactions through atomic and molecular structure. This is a university level course, treating the material in sufficient depth so that students can solve chemical problems and can understand the principles involved in their solution. It includes an introduction to condensed matter. Section 003 is open to freshman only and best suited for students with interest and good high school preparation in chemistry and the physical sciences. This course is suitable for majors or non-majors and is recommended to satisfy either major or preprofessional requirements for general chemistry.
CHEM 101 003 | MWFCHEMISTRY BUILDING102
Fulfills: Physical World Sector
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement

HONORS CHEMISTRY I: Experimental Perspectives.
JESSICA ANNA    
This course will focus on introducing students to the following topics: the nature of the chemical bond (forces, potentials, and quantum mechanics), covalent and non-covalent interactions, properties of gasses, and interactions of molecules with light. In addition to covering these topics, students will also be introduced to both common and stat-of-the art experimental techniques. We will discuss how these techniques can be used to study and characterize different properties of molecules.
CHEM 114 001 | MWFCHEMISTRY BUILDING514
Fulfills: Physical World Sector
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement

COPYRIGHT AND CULTURE
PETER DECHERNEY    
This topic course explores aspects of Cinema and Media Studies intensively. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website <cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.
CIMS 015 401 | TRFISHER-BENNETT HALL140
Fulfills: Freshman SeminarSector IV: Humanities & Social Sciences
Tags: Freshmen Seminars

MODERN SCI-FI CINEMA
CHRISTOPHER DONOVAN    
Science Fiction has been a cinematic genre for as long as there has been cinema—at least since Georges Melies’s visionary Trip to the Moon in 1902. However, though science fiction films have long been reliable box office earners and cult phenomena, critical acknowledgement and analysis was slow to develop. Still, few genres reflect the sensibility of their age so transparently—if often unconsciously—or provide so many opportunities for filmmakers to simultaneously address social issues and expand the lexicon with new technologies. Given budgetary considerations and the appetite for franchises, science fiction auteurs face a difficult negotiation between artistic expression and lowest common denominator imperatives, the controversy over Terry Gilliam’s Brazil (1985) being perhaps the most infamous example. Nevertheless, many notable filmmakers have done their most perceptive and influential work in the scifi realm, including Gilliam, Ridley Scott, David Cronenberg, Paul Verhoeven, James Cameron and Alfonso Cuaron. This course will survey the scope of contemporary science fiction cinema, after looking first at seminal works like Metropolis (1927) and 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) that continue to cast their shadow over the genre. We will then devote considerable time to a pair of more modern films, Scott’s Alien (1979) and Blade Runner (1982), which drew from earlier movements (German expressionism, noir), influenced new ones (cyberpunk) and inspired a rare wave of academic discourse. Over the course of the term we will sample smaller, more independent-minded projects, such as Michel Gondry’s Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) and Spike Jonze’s Her (2013) as well as higher profile but much more risky epics from filmmakers such as Steven Spielberg and Christopher Nolan.
CIMS 016 301 | MWFISHER-BENNETT HALL16
Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & LettersFreshman Seminar
Tags: Freshmen Seminars

A CINEMA WE COULDN'T REFUSE: ITALIANS IN AMERICAN FILM
FRANK PELLICONE    
In the 1880’s the development of motion pictures heralded the rise of a new visual art that would not only shape but ultimately control the collective imagination of our nation. At the same time Italians left their home country in unprecedented numbers so that between 1880 and 1920 over four million Italians entered into the United States. As the film industry developed, the sudden influx of Italians offered a backdrop on which to project the changing views of the nation. Beginning with silent films, such as The Sheik with Rudolph Valentino, we will consider the ways that Hollywood exploited the Italian diaspora to develop a stock of familiar characters including hot-blooded lotharios, ruthless gangsters, wily tricksters, and lovable losers with which we have become familiar. We will review the history of the Italian immigrant experience and simultaneously examine the development of the American film industry, ultimately to consider the ways that Italian images on screen projected the fears, desires, anxieties, and struggles of a growing American psyche.
CIMS 016 302 | TRHARRISON COLLEGE HOUSEM20
Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & LettersFreshman Seminar
Tags: Freshmen Seminars

FOUNDATIONS OF MKT ECON
JESUS FERNANDEZ-VILLAVERDE    
This course will study the historical and intellectual forces behind the appearance of market economies on the world stage. The voyages of exploration undertaken by Europeans in the 15th and 16th century created, in just a few decades, a global economy. By 1600, silver from Mexico was exchanged in Manila for ceramics made in Nanjing (China). After a long trip through the Pacific, Mexico, and the Atlantic, the ceramics ended up in the tables of prosperous merchants in Bruges (modern day Belgium). How did this integrated global economy appear? How did global interconnections over the centuries shap our current world? How did markets emerge and influence these interconnections? Who were the winners of globalization? And who were the losers? How did economists, political scientists, and others think about the strengths and weakness of market economies? This course will explore these questions and the role that markets have played in it from the late 15th century to the present. Even if the economic theory will structure much of the discussion, insights from intellectual history, cultural history, microhistory, legal history, and institutional history will help to frame the main narrative. The course will be, as well, truly global. First, beyond the traditional focus of economic history courses on Europe and the Americas, particular attention will be devoted to Africa and Asia. Second, the priority will be to highlight the interconnections between the different regions and to understand how the people living in them negotiated the opportunities and tensions created by the economic transformations triggered by globalization and how they conceptualized the changing lives around them. Finally, the class will highlight how diverse intellectual traditions handled the challenges presented by historical change.
ECON 271 001 | MWMCNEIL BUILDING395
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Principally for Major

SEX AND SOCIALISM
KRISTEN GHODSEE    
This seminar examines classic and current scholarship and literature on gender and sexuality in contemporary Eastern Europe, and examines the dialogue and interchange of ideas between East and West. Although the scholarly and creative works will primarily investigate the changing status of women during the last three decades, the course will also look at changing constructions of masculinity and LGBT movements and communities in the former communist bloc. Topics will include: the woman question before 1989; gender and emerging nationalisms; visual representations in television and film; social movements; work; romance and intimacy; spirituality; and investigations into the constructed concepts of "freedom" and "human rights."
EEUR 160 401 | TRJAFFE BUILDING113
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

NAT DISTURB & DISASTERS
STEPHEN PHIPPS    
Natural disturbances play a fundamental role in sculpturing landscapes and structuring natural and human-based ecosystems. This course explores the natural and social science of disturbances by analyzing their geologic causes, their ecological and social consequences, and the role of human behavior in disaster reduction and mitigation. Volcanoes, earthquakes, floods, droughts, fires, and extraterrestrial impacts are analyzed and compared.
GEOL 103 001 | MWFDAVID RITTENHOUSE LABA1
Fulfills: Physical World SectorQuantitative Data Analysis
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE
IRINA MARINOV    
Public perceptions and attitudes concerning the causes and importance of globalwarming have changed. Global Climate Change provides a sound theoretical understanding of global warming through an appreciation of the Earth's climate system and how and why this has changed through time. We will describe progress in understanding of the human and natural drivers of climate change, climate pr0cesses and attribution, and estimates of projected future climate change. We will assess scientific, tehnical, and socio-economic information relevant for the understanding of climate change, its potential impacts and options for adaptation and mitigation.
GEOL 204 001 | TRHAYDEN HALL360
Fulfills: Physical World Sector
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

FREE SPEECH & CENSORSHIP
SOPHIA ROSENFELD    
This course will explore the idea of free speech - its justification, its relationship to various forms of censorship, and its proper limits - as a historical, philosophical, legal, and ultimately, political question. In the first half of the course, we will explore the long history across the West of the regulation of various kinds of ideas and their expression, from malicious gossip to heresies, and read classic arguments for and against censorship, copyright protections, and standards of taste and decency and of truth. In the second part of the seminar, after looking at how the idea of freedom of speech came to seem an existential prerequisite for democracy as well as individual liberty, we will take up the historical and philosophical questions posed by such recent dilemmas as whether or not hate speech deserves the protection of the First Amendment, the distinction between art and pornography from the perspective of freedom of expression, speech during wartime, and the transformative effects of the internet on the circulation and regulation of ideas. We will end the semester by thinking about the globalization of the idea of free speech as a human right and its implications, both positive and negative. Readings will range from Robert Darnton's The Forbidden Best-Sellers of Pre-Revolutionary France, to D. H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover, to documents concerning the cartoons of Charlie Hebdo and law review articles about Citizens United v. FEC. We will also make considerable use of local resources, from museums to the library.
HIST 133 001 | TRCOLLEGE HALL314
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

THE VIKINGS
ADA KUSKOWSKI    
The Vikings were the terror of Europe from the late eight to the eleventh century. Norwegians, Danes and Swedes left their homeland to trade, raid and pillage; leaving survivors praying "Oh Lord, deliver us from the fury of the Norsemen!" While commonly associated with violent barbarism, the Norse were also farmers, craftsmen, and merchants. As their dragon ships sailed the waterways of Europe and beyond, they also transformed from raiders to explorers, discoverers and settlers of found and conquered lands. This course will introduce students to various facets of the culture and society of the Viking world ranging from honor culture, gender roles, political culture, mythology, and burial practices. We will also explore the range of Viking activity abroad from Kiev and Constantinople to Greenland and Vineland, the Viking settlement in North America. We will use material and archeological sources as well as literary and historical ones in order to think about how we know history and what questions we can ask from different sorts of sources. Notably, we will be reading Icelandic sagas that relate oral histories of heroes, outlaws, raiders and sailors that will lead us to question the lines between fact and fiction, and myth and history.
HIST 303 401 | TRCOLLEGE HALL318
Fulfills: Cross Cultural Analysis
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

Snip and Tuck: A History of Surgery
BETH LINKER    
Before the discovery of anesthesia in the nineteenth century, surgery was often a grizzly and horrific affair, inevitably involving extreme pain. Surgeons had a reputation as dirty, blood-thirsty "barbarians," and patients rarely sought out their services. But all of this changed during the twentieth century. Today surgery is one of the most prestigious medical specialties, and patients-especially those who long to look younger, thinner, and trimmer-voluntarily submit to multiple procedures. This course will investigate the cultural and scientific sources of these dramatic changes, with readings ranging from graphic descriptions of "bonesetting" and suturing during the Middle Ages to contemporary accounts of childbirth and plastic surgery in antisepctic hospitals and clinics.
HSOC 042 301 | TCLAUDIA COHEN HALL337
Fulfills: Freshman SeminarSector II: History & Tradition
Tags: Freshmen Seminars

STEM CELLS, SCI, & SOC: Stemcells, Science, and Society
JOHN GEARHART     KENNETH ZARET    
Stem cells have dominated the biomedical news over the past decade, impacting on society with regard to medicine, ethics, religion, law, politics, economics, and education. Stem cells serve as the premier example for a number of critical and controversial issues at the interface of scientific research, medicine, and society. This course is intended for upper class Penn undergraduates who are not majoring in the sciences. We will explain the basics behind stem cells, the quest for medical therapies, and the impact on, and role of, diverse societal issues.
HSOC 241 301 | TRWILLIAMS HALL202
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

POLITICS: RHETORIC AND POWER IN ITALIAN CULTURE AND BEYOND
ALESSANDRA MIRRA    
Italian political thought is tightly interlaced with literature, poetry and fiction. Many renowned writers, such as Dante and Machiavelli, were primarily considered political authors rather than literary icons, and their writings influenced and shaped political discourse in Italy and across Western culture. Their work is still of great interest for the Humanities, the Social and Political sciences, History, and Philosophy. In this course, we will examine the work of these authors, focusing on different genres (from poetry to political treatises, satire, and theater) and paying special attention to the language they employed to convey their innovative political views. We will frame these works within their historical and literary context, but also in relation to today's politics. At the center of those works, there are many themes of great current interest, such as the division of Church and State, the relationship between the State and its citizens, the separation of powers into three branches, the death penalty, and the rhetorical strategies employed by politicians running for power and by their opponents. Readings will include, among others, works by Dante, Machiavelli, Vico, Beccaria, Leopardi, D’Annunzio, Pasolini, Gentile and Gramsci.
ITAL 100 401 | MWFFISHER-BENNETT HALL201
Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & LettersFreshman Seminar
Tags: Freshmen Seminars

HUMANISM & RENAISSANCE
EVA DEL SOLDATO    
Humanism and the Renaissance have traditionally been regarded as a dramatic departure from the dark Middle Ages. The first to suggest this interpretation were Renaissance men themselves, and though today that image has been mitigated and corrected, it is undeniable that the Renaissance was actually a period of profound change in values and ways of understanding. The rediscovery of long lost texts and cultural heritage of the ancient world forced Renaissance thinkers to reconsider many of their most traditional assets, while old authorities crumbled before the scrutiny of new methodologies. This course will investigate the Italian Renaissance and Humanism in a wider European context, focusing on authors such as Petrarch, Machiavelli, Leonardo, Erasmus, More, and Luther. Material from the Rare Books and Manuscript Library will be used throughout the course. The course will be taught in English. The Italian Component is offered to declared and prospective Majors/Minors in Italian Studies who will have the possibility to read course materials and write assignments in Italian, upon request.
ITAL 300 401 | TRVAN PELT LIBRARY627
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

BEETHOVEN'S 9TH SYMPHONY
LAWRENCE BERNSTEIN    
Music 16. Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. On 5 May 1824, Ludwig van Beethoven mounted the podium at the Kärntnerthor Theater in Vienna to conduct the premiere of his Ninth Symphony. His decision to do so was ill-advised, to say the least. Beethoven was totally deaf. The performance was held together—to the extent that it was at all—through the efforts of a second conductor who led from within the orchestra. Beethoven was still conducting well after the music had ended, and he had to be turned around physically to acknowledge the applause of the audience. The performance must have been a shambles. Nonetheless, beginning with the moment its final notes died away, the Ninth Symphony transformed the music of the Western world and became a major monument of its culture. The melody to which Beethoven set Friedrich Schiller’s “Ode to Joy” is now the anthem of the European Union. One can witness performances of the symphony on Japanese soccer fields with choruses of 10,000. In 1989, when Germany was reunited after the fall of the Berlin Wall, it was a performance of the Ninth Symphony that celebrated the moment. In this seminar, we shall study Beethoven’s Ninth in detail, examining it in the context of the symphony of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Among the topics to be probed are the premiere, Schiller’s ode and what it meant to Beethoven, how the composer met the challenge of pacing a symphony that (for the first time) lasted for well over an hour, and the qualities of the work that led to its iconic position in the history of Western music.
MUSC 016 301 | MWLERNER CENTER (MUSIC BUILDING102
Fulfills: Sector III: Arts & LettersFreshman Seminar
Tags: Freshmen Seminars | Fulfills a College Requirement

VOICING POLITICS/POLITICIZING VOICES
MARIA MURPHY    
What does it mean to have a voice? To raise your voice? To have your voice heard? What do our voices say about us and what do they fail to communicate? How we speak and how our voices are perceived impact our interactions in daily life, our participation in the political sphere, and our capacity to effect change through activism. This CWiC course explores the parameters by which voice is defined in the context of music and sound studies, social justice, philosophy, and media and communication studies. We will consider how voice embodies our political constitution through an examination of the vocal practices of artists such as Tanya Tagaq, Anohni, Juliana Huxtable, Laurie Anderson, Sikh Knowledge, and Lucas Silveira; the phenomena of voice-activated devices such as Apple’s Siri and Amazon’s Echo; and the collective voices of movements such as Black Lives Matter and the Standing Rock water protectors. Through individual and group presentations, discussions, and creative projects, this critical speaking seminar encourages students to develop their oral communication skills while examining what informs their individual and collective voices. No previous musical training required. Enrollment limited to 16.
MUSC 048 401 | TRFISHER-BENNETT HALL406
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Communication Within the Curriculum

MUSIC OF SOUTH & SE ASIA
JAMES SYKES    
What role does music play in articulating religious identities and spaces? What is the importance of ritual musics as they persist and change in the modern world? How does music reflect and articulate religious ways of thinking and acting? In this course, we explore these and other questions about the interrelations between music, religion, and ritual in South and Southeast Asia. Focusing on India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, and Indonesia, the course emphasizes musics from Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim and Christian traditions; nevertheless, it draws widely to touch upon sacred musics in Pakistan, Nepal, Burma, Thailand, Vietnam, and among some indigenous peoples in the region. Throughout, we explore ontologies of sound; sonic occurrences in religious structures, public processions, and pilgrimage sites; the construction of religion and ritual as ideas forged through colonial encounter and modern scholarship on religion; the politics of sacred sounds in today's public spaces and contemporary media, such as television and online; and the surprising fluidity between popular and sacred musical genres.
MUSC 252 401 | TRFISHER-BENNETT HALL406
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Principally for Major

HIST ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY
SUSAN MEYER    
This course is an introduction to philosopy in the ancient world. While today, philosophy is considered a branch of academic inquiry, many of the ancient Greeks and Romans, however, held a radically different conception of the discipline. For them, philosophy was nothing less than an entire way of life--not just a set of doctrines or arguments, but an orientation and set of lived practices, a conscious and continual reforming of the self in light of some principle or principles. In this course, we will examine the major movements and figures of ancient philosophy. Major figures will include Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans, and the Skeptics.
PHIL 003 401 | TRSTEPHEN A. LEVIN BUILDING111
Fulfills: History & Tradition Sector
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement

ETHICS OF EATING
ANDREW CHIGNELL    
We all face difficult moral decisions on occasion. This course introduces students to the idea that we face such a decision several times a day in deciding what to eat. How should facts about animal life and death inform this decision? Is the suffering involved in meat, egg, and dairy production really bad en0ough to make the practices immoral? How do our dietary choices affect local and non-local economies, the environment, and other people generally? Finally, given the deep connections between eating practices and various ethnic, religious and class identities, how can we implement a reasonable food policy for an expanding world population while also respecting these important differences? The goal of this course is not to teach some preferred set of answers to these questions. The goal is rather to give participants the basic tools required to reflect clearly and effectively on the questions themselves. These tools include a working knowledge of major moral theories developed by philosophers, and an understanding of basic empirical issues related to food. In addition to readings, lectures, and required sections, the course may involve trips to some local food-production facilities, as well as supplemental lectures by experts from Penn, Philadelphia, and beyond.
PHIL 071 001 | MWCLAUDIA COHEN HALL204
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

CAPSTONE: MODELING: MODELING SOCIAL PHENOMENA
ALEXANDER FUNCKE    
Modeling provides a way to identify and analyze the salient features of complex problems or dynamic social situations. Using models can further providea way to see what strategies may be rational over time.
PPE 473 301 | TDAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB2N36
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

INTRO TO INTL RELATIONS
ALEXANDER WEISIGER    
This course is an introduction to the major theories and issues in international politics. The goals of the course are to give students a broad familiarity with the field of international relations, and to help them develop the analytical skills necessary to think critically about international politics. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Concepts and Theories of International Relations; 2) War and Security; 3) The Global Economy; and 4) Emerging Issues in International Relations.
PSCI 150 001 | MWSTITELER HALLB6
Fulfills: Society Sector
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS
TULIA FALLETI    
This course examines the dynamics of political and economic change in twentieth century Latin America, with the goal of achieving an understanding of contemporary politics in the region. We will analyze topics such as the incorporation of the region to the international economy and the consolidation of oligarchic states (1880s to 1930s), corporatism, populism, and elict pacts (1930s and 1940s), social revolution, democratic breakdown, and military rule (1960s and 1970s), transitions to democracy and human rights advocacy (1980s), makret-oriented reforms (1990s), and the turn to the left of current governments (2000s). The course will draw primarily from the experiences of Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile and Mexico. No prior knowledge of the region is required.
PSCI 213 401 | MWSTITELER HALLB21
Fulfills: Cross Cultural Analysis
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

NEUROSCIENCE AND SOCIETY
HILARY GERSTEIN    
Cognitive, social,and affective neuroscience have made tremendous progress in in the last two decades. As this progress continues, neuroscience is becoming increasingly relevant to all of the real-world endeavors that require understanding, predicting and changing human behavior. In this course we will examine the ways in which neuroscience is being applied in law, criminal justice, national defense, education, economics, business,and other sectors of society. For each application area we will briefly review those aspects of neuroscience that are most relevant, and then study the application in more detail.
PSYC 247 001 | MWGODDARD LAB101
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

SEMINAR DEVELOP PSYCH: PSYCH OF IMAGINATION
DEENA WEISBERG    
This seminar will examine how the imagination works and how it develops. Students in this course will read and discuss the latest research in this area, learn to analyze empirical articles in cognitive and developmental psychology, and explore the links between imaginative processes and other important cognitive skills.
PSYC 480 301 | MWWILLIAMS HALL217
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Principally for Major

SCIENCE & RELIGION
DONOVAN SCHAEFER    
Science and religion are often assumed to be two areas with no zone of overlap. Or they are seen as rivals, destined to make sparks whenever they come into contact. This course explores the interactions of science and religion. It will consider perspectives from science and technology studies on how the nature of "science" has changed over time, the history of science in its dynamic interactions with religion, and contemporary cognitive and evolutionary perspectives on the origins of religion.
RELS 011 301 | TRMEYERSON HALLB2
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

Modern Catholic Christianity
E MATTER    
At the turn of the twentieth century, Sigmund Freud hypothesized that religion was a dead duck. Many other thinkers of "modernity" have agreed with his thesis; and yet, over a century later, it is clear that religion is still a forceful presence in human culture. One religious tradition that has survived to the surprise (and even consternation) of some critics, is Roman Catholic Christianity. This Freshman Seminar will look closely at the Catholic Church in the twenty-first century, to explore the ways in which Catholicism has (and has not) adapted to modernity. We will begin with an investigation into the history of Roman Catholicism; how it is defined, and how it developed in relation to politics and culture in the Roman Empire, medieval and early moder Europe, and in the Americas; but most of the semester will focus on the Catholic Church of the past 200 years, especially as it appears in the United States. We will consider the relationship of Catholicism to many aspects of modern life, including science and technology, political systems and leaders, aesthetics (visual arts, music, literature and film), and understandings of gender and sexuality. There will be a mid-term examination and a final paper of 6 to 10 pages.
RELS 033 301 | MWCLAUDIA COHEN HALL392
Fulfills: Freshman SeminarSector II: History & Tradition
Tags: Freshmen Seminars

GOD AND MONEY
ANTHEA BUTLER    
The relationship between how people understand god(s) and money has always been a complicated one. Many religions have a relationship to money, whether in offerings, asking for blessings, or to build and create places worship. God and Money explores the relationship between how religions view money, capitalism, and religion, and how movements like the prosperity gospel have expanded and complicated the interplay between religion, money and capitalism around the world.
RELS 111 301 | MW
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

THE HISTORY OF GOD
STEVEN WEITZMAN    
This course introduces the history of God as understood by modern scholars of religion. Why do people believe in gods in the first place? How is the God of the Old Testament different from earlier Near Eastern dieties, or different from God as represented in the New Testament and the Quran? When and why did people come to question the existence of God, and how has the idea of God changed in the last century in light of experiences like the Holocaust, social movements like feminism, and the rise of new technologies like the Internet? This course will address these questions as it surveys the approaches scholars have developed to comprehend the history of a being who would seem beyond human comprehension.
RELS 132 401 | TRMCNEIL BUILDING395
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

ISLAM IN MODERN WORLD
JAMAL ELIAS    
This course key issues facing Muslims in the modern world with an emphasis on gaining an understanding of how Muslims view themselves and the world in which they live. Beginning with a discussion of the impact of colonialism, we will examine Islamic ideas and trends from the late colonial period until the present. Readings include religious, political and literary writings by important Muslim figures and focus on pressing issues in the Islamic world an beyond: the place of religion in modern national politics; the changing status of women; constructions of sexuality (including masculinity); pressing issues in bioethics; Islam, race and immigration in America; the role of violence; and the manifestations of religion in popular culture.
RELS 146 401 | TRCLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING110
Fulfills: Humanities & Social Science Sector
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

RELIGION & ECOLOGY
ALLISON COVEY    
This class will introduce the overlaps between religion and ecology. Rather than assuming that there is a necessary positive or negative relationship between religion and ecology, we will look at how these relationships have materialized in complicated ways at different moments in history. We'll consider perspectives and case studies from a range of different moments in history. We'll consider perspectives and case studies from a range of different traditions, with a special attention paid to the genesis of the field of Religion and Ecology in critiques of Christian attitudes toward the environment in the 1960s and 1970s.
RELS 211 301 | TRWILLIAMS HALL219
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

DEATH, DISEASE & DEMONS
MARY LEJA    
How did life end for people in the medieval world? For most, death was not considered an end point because the soul journeyed on after the end of the body. But to where did it journey? And how would it be re-united with the body in the future? Between the classical period and the High Middle Ages, death shifted from a moment of quiet release to a frightening struggle in which angels and demons lay in wait for a soul as soon as it exited the body. This course will examine these changing beleifs about dying, focusing primarily on Christian medieval Europe but drawing comparative examples from Judaism, the Roman world, and Byzantine Christianity. Other topics we'll consider include martyrdom and fears of bodily dismemberment; the emergence of purgatory and depictions of the afterworld; and the development of Christian rites for the dead. We'll also investigate beliefs about the invisible powers of demons and the apocalyptic end of times. The course will also explore not only the process by which people entered the afterlife in the Middle Ages but also the causes of their deaths-- what kinds of disease primarily afflicted medieval society, and how did age, class and gender intersect with disease to affect certain populations? We will end the semester by examining that most apocalyptic of Medieval events-- the Black Death-- in light of recent scientific discoveries, medieval medical explanations, and social changes brought on by this demographic catastrophe. Students will be exposed to a range of primary sources as well as evidence from tombstone inscriptions, architecture and manuscript illuminations, and archaeology. No prior knowledge of Medieval history is necessary.
RELS 239 301 | WDAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB3N6
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

SEX AND SOCIALISM
KRISTEN GHODSEE    
This seminar examines classic and current scholarship and literature on gender and sexuality in contemporary Eastern Europe, and examines the dialogue and interchange of ideas between East and West. Although the scholarly and creative works will primarily investigate the changing status of women during the last three decades, the course will also look at changing constructions of masculinity and LGBT movements and communities in the former communist bloc. Topics will include: the woman question before 1989; gender and emerging nationalisms; visual representations in television and film; social movements; work; romance and intimacy; spirituality; and investigations into the constructed concepts of freedom and human rights.
RUSS 160 401 | TRJAFFE BUILDING113
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences

INTRO MODRN S.ASIA LIT: NEW LITERATURES OF RESISTANCE AND REPRESENTATIONS
GREGORY GOULDING    
This course will provide a wide-ranging introduction to the literatures of South Asia from roughly 1500 to the present, as well as an exploration of their histories and impact on South Asian society today. How are literary movements and individual works- along with the attitudes towards religion, society, and culture associated with them - still influential in literature, film, and polular culture? How have writers across time and language engaged with questions of caste, gender, and identity? We will read from the rich archive of South Asian writing in translation - from languages that include Braj, Urdu, Bangla, and Tamil - to consider how these literatures depict their own society while continuing to resonate across time and space. Topics of dicussion will include the Bhakti poetries of personal devotion, the literature of Dalits - formerly referred to as the Untouchables - and the ways in which literature addresses contemporary political and social problems. Students will leave this course with a sense of the contours of the literatures of South Asia as well as ways of exploring the role of these literatures in the larger world. No prior knowledge of South Asia is required; this course fulfills the cross-cultural analysis requirement.
SAST 007 401 | MWFWILLIAMS HALL305
Fulfills: Cross Cultural Analysis
Tags: Various Audiences

INTRODUCTION TO HINDUISM
DAVESH SONEJI    
This course introduces students to the history, texts, philosophies and rituals of South Asia's oldest living religious traditions, represented today by the term "Hinduism." At the same time, it problematizes the idea of a monolithic "Hindu Tradition", in favor of an approach that recognizes several distinct, dynamic, yet symbiotic Hindu religious cultures. The course also places emphasis on the vitality of today's Hinduism(s), and the various historical, ritual, cultural, and social contexts that they represent and constitute. The course is organized around six modules: (1)Issues in the Academic Study of Hinduism; (2) Sanskrit (textual) tradition; (3) Philosophy; (4) Theology; (5) Ritual; and (6) Modernity and Contemporary Politics.
SAST 009 401 | TRFISHER-BENNETT HALL25
Fulfills: Cross Cultural Analysis
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

Everyday Technologies and the Making of the Modern World
IAN PETRIE    
Long before iPhones and Fitbits, personal technology -- small(ish), portable, purchasable -- had a tremendous impact on the lives of people around the globe.Items such as wristwatches, bicycles, sewing machines and radios could empower their users (or sometimes discipline them), creating economic, educational or recreational opportunities while also being associated with grander ideas and ideologies. This course will explore such everyday technologies across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, in locations spanning the Americas, Europe,Africa and Asia. We will consider how the use and significance of particular technologies varied according to time and place; how these everyday items couldcontribute to "self-fashioning" for individuals, nations, and empires; and how,through use and modification, consumers themselves could become part of the story of technological change. In addition to reading a variety of classic and recent scholarship, students will work with a wide array of primary sources (newspapers, photographs, patent records, trade cards) and use digital tools to present their own research projects.
STSC 078 301 | MWCLAUDIA COHEN HALL204
Fulfills: Freshman SeminarSector II: History & Tradition
Tags: Freshmen Seminars

ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY
MEGHAN CRNIC    
This course examines contemporary environmental issues such as energy, waste, pollution, health, population, biodiversity and climate through a historical and critical lens. All of these issues have important material, natural and technical aspects; they are also inextricably entangled with human history and culture. To understand the nature of this entanglement, the course will introduce key concepts and theoretical frameworks from science and technology studies and the environmental humanities and social sciences.
STSC 168 001 | MWEDUCATION BUILDING200
Fulfills: Humanities & Social Science Sector
Tags: Fulfills a College Requirement | Various Audiences

AMERICAN THEATRE-1960'S: Revolution in Performance, Politics and Ideas
JAMES SCHLATTER    
The 1960’s represents a watershed moment in America history, no less for the theatre than for the world of politics and culture at large. This course will investigate a wide range of new works created during this tumultuous decade. We will examine the radical work and ensemble process of experimental theatre companies such as The Open Theatre, The Living Theatre, and the Performance Group. We will read and discuss early plays by soon-to-be renowned playwrights such as Edward Albee, Sam Shepard, and John Guare. We will examine the rise of new Off-Broadway theatre companies such as Circle Rep and the American Place Theatre devoted to new American playwrights, as well as Joseph Papp’s Public Theatre. Finally, we will chart the development of the regional theatre movement in cities across the country. Students will do research and make presentations on work of individual playwrights, directors, actors, and theatre companies.
THAR 280 401 | TRFISHER-BENNETT HALL201
Fulfills: (none)
Tags: Various Audiences